Accumulating evidence suggests that functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) can provide an essential bridge between our current understanding of neural circuit organization and cortical activity in the developing brain. Indeed, fNIRS allows studying brain functions through the measurement of neurovascular coupling that links neural activity to subsequent changes in cerebral blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation levels. While the literature offers a multitude of fNIRS applications to typical development, only recently this tool has been extended to the study of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). The exponential rise of scientific publications on this topic during the last years reflects the interest to identify a “fNIRS signature” as a biomarker of high translational value to support both early clinical diagnosis and treatment outcome. The purpose of this systematic review is to describe the updating clinical applications of fNIRS in NDDs, with a specific focus on preschool population. Starting from this rationale, a systematic search was conducted for relevant studies in different scientific databases (Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science) resulting in 13 published articles. In these studies, fNIRS was applied in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or infants at high risk of developing ASD. Both functional connectivity in resting-state conditions and task-evoked brain activation using multiple experimental paradigms were used in the selected investigations, suggesting that fNIRS might be considered a promising method for identifying early quantitative biomarkers in the autism field.

Looking for “fNIRS Signature” in Autism Spectrum: A Systematic Review Starting From Preschoolers

Scaffei E.;Bosetti C.;Marchi V.;Costanzo V.;Dell'Oste V.;Dell'Osso L.;Carmassi C.;Muratori F.;Baroncelli L.;Calderoni S.;Battini R.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Accumulating evidence suggests that functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) can provide an essential bridge between our current understanding of neural circuit organization and cortical activity in the developing brain. Indeed, fNIRS allows studying brain functions through the measurement of neurovascular coupling that links neural activity to subsequent changes in cerebral blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation levels. While the literature offers a multitude of fNIRS applications to typical development, only recently this tool has been extended to the study of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). The exponential rise of scientific publications on this topic during the last years reflects the interest to identify a “fNIRS signature” as a biomarker of high translational value to support both early clinical diagnosis and treatment outcome. The purpose of this systematic review is to describe the updating clinical applications of fNIRS in NDDs, with a specific focus on preschool population. Starting from this rationale, a systematic search was conducted for relevant studies in different scientific databases (Pubmed, Scopus, and Web of Science) resulting in 13 published articles. In these studies, fNIRS was applied in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or infants at high risk of developing ASD. Both functional connectivity in resting-state conditions and task-evoked brain activation using multiple experimental paradigms were used in the selected investigations, suggesting that fNIRS might be considered a promising method for identifying early quantitative biomarkers in the autism field.
Conti, E.; Scaffei, E.; Bosetti, C.; Marchi, V.; Costanzo, V.; Dell'Oste, V.; Mazziotti, R.; Dell'Osso, L.; Carmassi, C.; Muratori, F.; Baroncelli, L.; Calderoni, S.; Battini, R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1137296
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