The present research assessed the possibility that locomotion orientation was related to hopeful thinking. Locomotion orientation represents the self-regulatory aspect concerned with movement from the current state to the desired end state (Kruglanski et al., 2000). Previous research has shown that individuals high in locomotion are future-oriented, optimistic, and goal-oriented (see Kruglanski et al., 2000; Kruglanski et al., 2015). Hope is a future-directed thinking process, involving a sense of agency (e.g., goal-directed energy) mixed with specific pathways to reach important goals (Snyder, 1994; Snyder et al., 1991). The present study was conducted with a sample of approximately 180 students from the University of Rome “Sapienza,” examining the basic relationship between locomotion orientation and hopeful thinking. We hypothesized, on the basis of its features, that locomotion orientation was associated with hopeful thinking. Our findings support this hypothesis, showing that the locomotion orientation was related with individuals’ hopeful thinking in both its components of agency” and “pathways”. Assessment orientation instead was found to be not related to hopeful thinking. These preliminary findings could add to our knowledge of locomotion orientation-specifically on its tendencies to move and progress – and may have some applicative aspects, as the individuals reporting higher levels of hope are more able to adjust their goal-directed behaviors toward important goal pursuits (Snyder et al., 2002).

Moving forward with hope: The role of locomotion mode on hopeful thinking

DI SANTO, DANIELA;
2016-01-01

Abstract

The present research assessed the possibility that locomotion orientation was related to hopeful thinking. Locomotion orientation represents the self-regulatory aspect concerned with movement from the current state to the desired end state (Kruglanski et al., 2000). Previous research has shown that individuals high in locomotion are future-oriented, optimistic, and goal-oriented (see Kruglanski et al., 2000; Kruglanski et al., 2015). Hope is a future-directed thinking process, involving a sense of agency (e.g., goal-directed energy) mixed with specific pathways to reach important goals (Snyder, 1994; Snyder et al., 1991). The present study was conducted with a sample of approximately 180 students from the University of Rome “Sapienza,” examining the basic relationship between locomotion orientation and hopeful thinking. We hypothesized, on the basis of its features, that locomotion orientation was associated with hopeful thinking. Our findings support this hypothesis, showing that the locomotion orientation was related with individuals’ hopeful thinking in both its components of agency” and “pathways”. Assessment orientation instead was found to be not related to hopeful thinking. These preliminary findings could add to our knowledge of locomotion orientation-specifically on its tendencies to move and progress – and may have some applicative aspects, as the individuals reporting higher levels of hope are more able to adjust their goal-directed behaviors toward important goal pursuits (Snyder et al., 2002).
978-88-941762-1-6
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1158131
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