ABSTRACT NUCA caches are large L2 on-chip cache memories characterized by multi-bank partitioning and designed to hide wire delay effects. They exhibit high hit rates while keeping access latency low. Proposed designs for such caches are Static NUCA, in which data are statically allocated to the cache banks, and Dynamic NUCA, in which data may reside in different banks, and a migration mechanism is introduced to better tolerate wire delay effects. The two architectures permit to achieve different performances by acting on architectural parameters and data management policies, at the cost of different balances between static and dynamic power consumption and energy dissipation. In this work, we propose preliminary results of the characterization of such balances, by presenting an evaluation of performance and energy consumption of conventional UCAs, and Static and Dynamic NUCA caches. All the considered caches architectures are equal sized and they are supposed to be used in an aggressive high frequency system running some applications from the SPEC CPU2000 and the NAS Parallel Benchmarks suites. The experimental results obtained indicate that, although the migration of data contributes to increase the dynamic energy consumption in Dynamic NUCA caches, the higher IPC achieved permits to save static energy, which dominates the power/energy balance in all the considered architectures. As a consequence, such results would designate NUCA caches as the most performing and energy saving architectures. Besides, according to the obtained results, future power improvements for NUCA caches should concentrate on static energy, while, for the dynamic energy, the on-chip network is the most critical element. Migration of data is acceptable, since it has a positive impact on performance, and the increased dynamic energy is overwhelmed by the static energy savings resulting from the shorter execution time. In order to give a general validity to such statements, we need to explore more design space points for each architecture (by varying the running clock rate and other design parameters) and to evaluate them considering a larger set of benchmarks

Analysis of Static and Dynamic Energy Consumptions in NUCA Caches: Initial Results

FOGLIA, PIERFRANCESCO;PRETE, COSIMO ANTONIO
2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT NUCA caches are large L2 on-chip cache memories characterized by multi-bank partitioning and designed to hide wire delay effects. They exhibit high hit rates while keeping access latency low. Proposed designs for such caches are Static NUCA, in which data are statically allocated to the cache banks, and Dynamic NUCA, in which data may reside in different banks, and a migration mechanism is introduced to better tolerate wire delay effects. The two architectures permit to achieve different performances by acting on architectural parameters and data management policies, at the cost of different balances between static and dynamic power consumption and energy dissipation. In this work, we propose preliminary results of the characterization of such balances, by presenting an evaluation of performance and energy consumption of conventional UCAs, and Static and Dynamic NUCA caches. All the considered caches architectures are equal sized and they are supposed to be used in an aggressive high frequency system running some applications from the SPEC CPU2000 and the NAS Parallel Benchmarks suites. The experimental results obtained indicate that, although the migration of data contributes to increase the dynamic energy consumption in Dynamic NUCA caches, the higher IPC achieved permits to save static energy, which dominates the power/energy balance in all the considered architectures. As a consequence, such results would designate NUCA caches as the most performing and energy saving architectures. Besides, according to the obtained results, future power improvements for NUCA caches should concentrate on static energy, while, for the dynamic energy, the on-chip network is the most critical element. Migration of data is acceptable, since it has a positive impact on performance, and the increased dynamic energy is overwhelmed by the static energy savings resulting from the shorter execution time. In order to give a general validity to such statements, we need to explore more design space points for each architecture (by varying the running clock rate and other design parameters) and to evaluate them considering a larger set of benchmarks
9781595938077
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/200443
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