The fibula has rarely been taken into consideration in anthropological studies, probably due to its relatively less important role in carrying load. However, looking at hominoids, the difference in morphology (and function) of the fibula between humans and apes, and within apes is evident, and is probably related to differences in positional behavior. Therefore, study of tibio-fibular relations may be useful in characterizing such differences. This study examines cross-sectional geometric properties (cortical area, CA and polar moment of area, J) of the tibia and fibula at 35, 50, 65% of bone length across a sample (N=105) of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, gibbons, and humans. All cross-sectional variables are analyzed against body mass x bone length. The fibula is compared against the tibia in the different groups. RMA lines are calculated. ANOVA is performed as well as post-hoc comparisons using the Tukey’s honestly significant difference test. The calculation of the percent prediction error is used to evaluate differences between species. When comparing the tibia against the fibula, it appears that gorillas and humans have relatively stronger tibia as compared to the other hominoids, and that orangutans and chimpanzees have relatively stronger fibula as compared to the other hominoids. Therefore, the lower limb polar moment of area appears to be useful in characterizing prevalently terrestrial versus prevalently arboreal hominoids, where the former appear to have relative more robust tibia than the latter. Further studies on the loading role of the hominoid fibula will be necessary to better understand the biomechanical role of this bone.

Cross-sectional geometric properties of the tibia-fibula complex of Hominoidea, and their relationships with locomotor behavior

MARCHI, DAMIANO;
2006

Abstract

The fibula has rarely been taken into consideration in anthropological studies, probably due to its relatively less important role in carrying load. However, looking at hominoids, the difference in morphology (and function) of the fibula between humans and apes, and within apes is evident, and is probably related to differences in positional behavior. Therefore, study of tibio-fibular relations may be useful in characterizing such differences. This study examines cross-sectional geometric properties (cortical area, CA and polar moment of area, J) of the tibia and fibula at 35, 50, 65% of bone length across a sample (N=105) of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, gibbons, and humans. All cross-sectional variables are analyzed against body mass x bone length. The fibula is compared against the tibia in the different groups. RMA lines are calculated. ANOVA is performed as well as post-hoc comparisons using the Tukey’s honestly significant difference test. The calculation of the percent prediction error is used to evaluate differences between species. When comparing the tibia against the fibula, it appears that gorillas and humans have relatively stronger tibia as compared to the other hominoids, and that orangutans and chimpanzees have relatively stronger fibula as compared to the other hominoids. Therefore, the lower limb polar moment of area appears to be useful in characterizing prevalently terrestrial versus prevalently arboreal hominoids, where the former appear to have relative more robust tibia than the latter. Further studies on the loading role of the hominoid fibula will be necessary to better understand the biomechanical role of this bone.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/103473
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 0
social impact