The first description of epileptic seizures due to brain tumours occurred in 19th century. Nevertheless, after over one hundred years, scientific literature is still lacking on how epilepsy and its treatment can affect tumour burden, progression and clinical outcomes. In patients with brain tumours, epilepsy dramatically impacts their quality of life (QoL). Even antiepileptic therapy seems to affect tumor lesion development. Numerous studies suggest that certain actors involved in epileptogenesis (inflammatory changes, glutamate and its ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, GABA-A and its GABA-AR receptor, as well as certain ligand- and voltage-gated ion channel) may also contribute to tumorigenesis. Although some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known operating on such mechanisms underlying epilepsy and tumor development, few preclinical and clinical studies have tried to investigate them as targets of pharmacological tools acting to control both phenomena. The primary aim of this review is to summarize known determinants and pathophysiological mechanisms of seizures, as well as of cell growth and spread, in patients with brain tumors. Therefore, a special focus will be provided on the anticancer effects of commonly prescribed AEDs (including levetiracetam, valproic acid, oxcarbazepine and others), with an overview of both preclinical and clinical data. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.

Epileptogenesis and oncogenesis: An antineoplastic role for antiepileptic drugs in brain tumours?

Cucchiara F.
Primo
;
Pasqualetti F.;Giorgi F. S.;Danesi R.;Bocci G.
Ultimo
2020-01-01

Abstract

The first description of epileptic seizures due to brain tumours occurred in 19th century. Nevertheless, after over one hundred years, scientific literature is still lacking on how epilepsy and its treatment can affect tumour burden, progression and clinical outcomes. In patients with brain tumours, epilepsy dramatically impacts their quality of life (QoL). Even antiepileptic therapy seems to affect tumor lesion development. Numerous studies suggest that certain actors involved in epileptogenesis (inflammatory changes, glutamate and its ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, GABA-A and its GABA-AR receptor, as well as certain ligand- and voltage-gated ion channel) may also contribute to tumorigenesis. Although some antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are known operating on such mechanisms underlying epilepsy and tumor development, few preclinical and clinical studies have tried to investigate them as targets of pharmacological tools acting to control both phenomena. The primary aim of this review is to summarize known determinants and pathophysiological mechanisms of seizures, as well as of cell growth and spread, in patients with brain tumors. Therefore, a special focus will be provided on the anticancer effects of commonly prescribed AEDs (including levetiracetam, valproic acid, oxcarbazepine and others), with an overview of both preclinical and clinical data. Potential clinical applications of this finding are discussed.
Cucchiara, F.; Pasqualetti, F.; Giorgi, F. S.; Danesi, R.; Bocci, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1040270
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