Objective.Increasing evidence confirms a strict relationship between mental disorders and physical health. Particularly, stressful life events and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been closely correlated with various physical disorders and somatic symptoms, such as chronic pain, gastrointestinal disorders, and headaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the emergence of somatic symptoms in a sample of young adult survivors 21 months after exposure to the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, with particular attention to PTSD and gender impact.Methods.Four hundred and fifty high-school senior students (253 male and 197 female) exposed to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, 21 months earlier, were enrolled and evaluated by the Trauma and Loss Spectrum Self-Report (TALS-SR), for symptomatological PTSD, and the Mood Spectrum Self-Report-Lifetime Version (MOODS-SR) "rhythmicity and vegetative functions" domain, for somatic symptoms.Results.Significantly higher rates of endorsement of the MOODS-SR somatic symptoms emerged in survivors with PTSD compared to those without. Females reported higher rates of endorsement of at least one MOODS-SR somatic symptom compared to males; however, a Decision Tree model and a two-way analysis of variance model confirmed a significant effect of PTSD only. A multivariate logistical regression showed a significant association between the presence of at least one MOOD-SR somatic symptom and re-experiencing and maladaptive coping TALS-SR domains.Conclusion.This study corroborates a relevant impact of symptomatological PTSD, across both the genders, on somatic symptoms occurring in young adults after months from exposure to a massive earthquake.

Do somatic symptoms relate to PTSD and gender after earthquake exposure? A cross-sectional study on young adult survivors in Italy

Carmassi C.;Dell'Oste V.;Pedrinelli V.;Cordone A.;Cappelli A.;Bertelloni C.;Dell'Osso L.
2020-01-01

Abstract

Objective.Increasing evidence confirms a strict relationship between mental disorders and physical health. Particularly, stressful life events and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been closely correlated with various physical disorders and somatic symptoms, such as chronic pain, gastrointestinal disorders, and headaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the emergence of somatic symptoms in a sample of young adult survivors 21 months after exposure to the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, with particular attention to PTSD and gender impact.Methods.Four hundred and fifty high-school senior students (253 male and 197 female) exposed to the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, 21 months earlier, were enrolled and evaluated by the Trauma and Loss Spectrum Self-Report (TALS-SR), for symptomatological PTSD, and the Mood Spectrum Self-Report-Lifetime Version (MOODS-SR) "rhythmicity and vegetative functions" domain, for somatic symptoms.Results.Significantly higher rates of endorsement of the MOODS-SR somatic symptoms emerged in survivors with PTSD compared to those without. Females reported higher rates of endorsement of at least one MOODS-SR somatic symptom compared to males; however, a Decision Tree model and a two-way analysis of variance model confirmed a significant effect of PTSD only. A multivariate logistical regression showed a significant association between the presence of at least one MOOD-SR somatic symptom and re-experiencing and maladaptive coping TALS-SR domains.Conclusion.This study corroborates a relevant impact of symptomatological PTSD, across both the genders, on somatic symptoms occurring in young adults after months from exposure to a massive earthquake.
Carmassi, C.; Dell'Oste, V.; Barberi, F. M.; Pedrinelli, V.; Cordone, A.; Cappelli, A.; Cremone, I. M.; Rossi, R.; Bertelloni, C.; Dell'Osso, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1052878
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