Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disorder leading to structural changes in the intestinal wall. In humans, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been proposed as a promising marker of IBD. This study evaluated the possible clinical and prognostic significance of the NLR in dogs with IBD. This retrospective study enrolled 41 dogs diagnosed with IBD presented to University of Pisa from January 2017 to January 2018. For each dog, age, sex, canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI), endoscopic and histopathological grading were recorded. Complete blood count, serum total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and C-reactive protein at the time of endoscopy were recorded. A control group (CG) of healthy dogs from a blood donor database was built. NLR was calculated for both IBD and CG as the ratio between absolute neutrophils and lymphocytes. Presence of crypt distension, lacteal dilation (LD), mucosal fibrosis, intraepithelial lymphocytes was recorded. Follow-up information was obtained from electronic medical records and dogs were classified as responders and non-responders based on CCECAI variation between admission and the first recheck. IRE dogs showed higher NLR compared to healthy dogs. NLR correlated negatively with total protein, albumin, and cholesterol and correlated positively with CCECAI. Dogs with LD showed higher NLR than dogs without LD. Non-responders showed higher NLR compared to responders. In conclusion, as in IBD human patients, the NLR acts as an inflammatory marker providing further information on severity of the disease and could be useful in predicting treatment response.

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

Gori E.
;
Lubas G.;Marchetti V.
Ultimo
2020-01-01

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disorder leading to structural changes in the intestinal wall. In humans, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has been proposed as a promising marker of IBD. This study evaluated the possible clinical and prognostic significance of the NLR in dogs with IBD. This retrospective study enrolled 41 dogs diagnosed with IBD presented to University of Pisa from January 2017 to January 2018. For each dog, age, sex, canine chronic enteropathy clinical activity index (CCECAI), endoscopic and histopathological grading were recorded. Complete blood count, serum total protein, albumin, cholesterol, and C-reactive protein at the time of endoscopy were recorded. A control group (CG) of healthy dogs from a blood donor database was built. NLR was calculated for both IBD and CG as the ratio between absolute neutrophils and lymphocytes. Presence of crypt distension, lacteal dilation (LD), mucosal fibrosis, intraepithelial lymphocytes was recorded. Follow-up information was obtained from electronic medical records and dogs were classified as responders and non-responders based on CCECAI variation between admission and the first recheck. IRE dogs showed higher NLR compared to healthy dogs. NLR correlated negatively with total protein, albumin, and cholesterol and correlated positively with CCECAI. Dogs with LD showed higher NLR than dogs without LD. Non-responders showed higher NLR compared to responders. In conclusion, as in IBD human patients, the NLR acts as an inflammatory marker providing further information on severity of the disease and could be useful in predicting treatment response.
2020
Benvenuti, E.; Pierini, A.; Gori, E.; Lucarelli, C.; Lubas, G.; Marchetti, V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1054778
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