Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) interfere with cellular metabolism contributing to oncogenesis. Mutations of IDH2 at R140 and R172 residues are observed in 20% of acute myeloid leukemias (AML), and the availability of the IDH2 inhibitor Enasidenib made IDH2 mutational screening a clinical need. The aim of this study was to set a new quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, the drop-off digital droplet PCR (drop-off ddPCR), as a sensitive and accurate tool for detecting IDH2 mutations. With this technique we tested 60 AML patients. Sanger sequencing identified 8/60 (13.5%) mutated cases, while ddPCR and the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR, used as a reference technique, identified mutations in 13/60 (21.6%) cases. When the outcome of IDH2-mutated was compared to that of wild-type patients, no significant difference in terms of quality of response, overall survival, or progression-free survival was observed. Finally, we monitored IDH2 mutations during follow-up in nine cases, finding that IDH2 can be considered a valid marker of minimal residual disease (MRD) in 2/3 of our patients. In conclusion, a rapid screening of IDH2 mutations is now a clinical need well satisfied by ddPCR, but the role of IDH2 as a marker for MRD still remains a matter of debate.

Digital droplet PCR is a specific and sensitive tool for detecting IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia patients

Grassi S.;Guerrini F.;Ciabatti E.;Salehzadeh S.;Domenichini C.;Mazzantini E.;Mazziotta F.;Galimberti S.
2020

Abstract

Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) interfere with cellular metabolism contributing to oncogenesis. Mutations of IDH2 at R140 and R172 residues are observed in 20% of acute myeloid leukemias (AML), and the availability of the IDH2 inhibitor Enasidenib made IDH2 mutational screening a clinical need. The aim of this study was to set a new quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, the drop-off digital droplet PCR (drop-off ddPCR), as a sensitive and accurate tool for detecting IDH2 mutations. With this technique we tested 60 AML patients. Sanger sequencing identified 8/60 (13.5%) mutated cases, while ddPCR and the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR, used as a reference technique, identified mutations in 13/60 (21.6%) cases. When the outcome of IDH2-mutated was compared to that of wild-type patients, no significant difference in terms of quality of response, overall survival, or progression-free survival was observed. Finally, we monitored IDH2 mutations during follow-up in nine cases, finding that IDH2 can be considered a valid marker of minimal residual disease (MRD) in 2/3 of our patients. In conclusion, a rapid screening of IDH2 mutations is now a clinical need well satisfied by ddPCR, but the role of IDH2 as a marker for MRD still remains a matter of debate.
Grassi, S.; Guerrini, F.; Ciabatti, E.; Puccetti, R.; Salehzadeh, S.; Metelli, M. R.; Di Vita, A.; Domenichini, C.; Caracciolo, F.; Orciuolo, E.; Pelosini, M.; Mazzantini, E.; Rossi, P.; Mazziotta, F.; Petrini, M.; Galimberti, S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1069050
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