Background: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a noninvasive biomarker of type 2 asthma that can predict response to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Little is known regarding the magnitude of FeNO reduction after an oral corticosteroid (OCS) course, and less is known whether there are differential responses based on race in children with mild-to-moderate asthma. Objective: To assess the effect of a short course of OCS on FeNO in children with asthma and to determine whether the effect is influenced by race. Methods: Children presenting with an acute asthma exacerbation, who had a FeNO measurement within the past 6 months when clinically stable, were enrolled. Spirometry and FeNO were obtained at the time of exacerbation and after a short course of prednisone. Results: A total of 92 children were identified (aged 11 ± 3.3 years; white, n = 46 [50%], Hispanics, n = 30 [33%], African Americans [AAs], n = 16 [7%]). At baseline, AAs were more atopic and had higher mean FeNO values than both white (48.9 vs 25.6 ppb; P < .05) and Hispanic children (22.5 ppb; P < .05), despite being prescribed similar inhaled corticosteroid doses. During the exacerbation, AAs had the highest FeNO values, whereas there was no difference in lung function between AAs and non-AAs. After prednisone therapy, there was a 56.6% reduction in FeNO, and although AAs maintained the highest FeNO levels, the relative reduction was similar between AAs and non-AAs (53.9% vs 57.8%, respectively). Conclusion: FeNO levels reduced by more than 50% after an OCS course. African American children had a greater degree of type 2-driven airway inflammation at baseline, during an exacerbation and after a short course of OCS, compared with non-AAs, although the relative reduction in FeNO was similar between the groups.

Fractional exhaled nitric oxide response to oral corticosteroids in children with mild-to-moderate asthma: Influence of race.

Comberiati P;Peroni D;Morganti R;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a noninvasive biomarker of type 2 asthma that can predict response to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Little is known regarding the magnitude of FeNO reduction after an oral corticosteroid (OCS) course, and less is known whether there are differential responses based on race in children with mild-to-moderate asthma. Objective: To assess the effect of a short course of OCS on FeNO in children with asthma and to determine whether the effect is influenced by race. Methods: Children presenting with an acute asthma exacerbation, who had a FeNO measurement within the past 6 months when clinically stable, were enrolled. Spirometry and FeNO were obtained at the time of exacerbation and after a short course of prednisone. Results: A total of 92 children were identified (aged 11 ± 3.3 years; white, n = 46 [50%], Hispanics, n = 30 [33%], African Americans [AAs], n = 16 [7%]). At baseline, AAs were more atopic and had higher mean FeNO values than both white (48.9 vs 25.6 ppb; P < .05) and Hispanic children (22.5 ppb; P < .05), despite being prescribed similar inhaled corticosteroid doses. During the exacerbation, AAs had the highest FeNO values, whereas there was no difference in lung function between AAs and non-AAs. After prednisone therapy, there was a 56.6% reduction in FeNO, and although AAs maintained the highest FeNO levels, the relative reduction was similar between AAs and non-AAs (53.9% vs 57.8%, respectively). Conclusion: FeNO levels reduced by more than 50% after an OCS course. African American children had a greater degree of type 2-driven airway inflammation at baseline, during an exacerbation and after a short course of OCS, compared with non-AAs, although the relative reduction in FeNO was similar between the groups.
2020
Comberiati, P; Peroni, D; Malka-Rais, J; Morganti, R; Spahn, Jd
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1070444
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