To investigate whether a K-rich/Na-poor salt is able to reduce blood pressure, 10 mildly hypertensive inpatients (six males) aged 28-53 years, with supine diastolic blood pressure (DBP) > 95 mmHg after 5 days of hospitalization, on a standard diet containing about 20 mmol Na plus 4 g common salt (CS) were randomly given, in double-blind conditions, 2 g twice daily of either CS (five patients) or K-rich/Na-poor, salt (five patients) to add to food for a further 8 days. Mean blood prssure was significanlty (P<0.01) reduced to a similar extent in both groups in the first 4 days, and declined significantly (P<0.01) only in the K/Na group in the following 8 days, reaching values significantly (P<0.01) lower than those of the CS group. The heart rate did not change significantly while body weight decreased to a similar extent in both groups. Urinary sodium excretion was similarly and significantly (P<0.01) reduced in both groups in the first 4 days (CS 100.8 ±7.9 and K/Na 100.2±11.0 mmol/24h, and remained unchanged in the CS group (109.9±4.3 mmol/24h) but declined significantly (P<0.05) by about 50% in the K/Na group (62.9±3.6 mmol/24h) in the following 8 days. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma noradrenaline did not differ significantly between the two groups, nor among the days of treatment, but the mean blood pressure response to mental stress was reduced significantly (P<0.4) in the Na/K group compared with the CS group. These findings indicate that a reduction in sodium intake, from about 100 to 50 mmol/day, linked with a small (20 mmol/day) potassium supplementation, can further reduce blood pressure in hypertensives whose blood pressure is already reduced but not normalized by a relatively low-sodium diet and/or by hospitalization. This haemodynamic response is linked to both a lack of stimulation of renin secretion and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and to a reduced cardiovascular response to SNS stimulation as induced by mental stress.

Potassium-rich and sodium-poor salt reduces blood pressure in hospitalized patients.

TADDEI, STEFANO;SALVETTI, ANTONIO
1986

Abstract

To investigate whether a K-rich/Na-poor salt is able to reduce blood pressure, 10 mildly hypertensive inpatients (six males) aged 28-53 years, with supine diastolic blood pressure (DBP) > 95 mmHg after 5 days of hospitalization, on a standard diet containing about 20 mmol Na plus 4 g common salt (CS) were randomly given, in double-blind conditions, 2 g twice daily of either CS (five patients) or K-rich/Na-poor, salt (five patients) to add to food for a further 8 days. Mean blood prssure was significanlty (P<0.01) reduced to a similar extent in both groups in the first 4 days, and declined significantly (P<0.01) only in the K/Na group in the following 8 days, reaching values significantly (P<0.01) lower than those of the CS group. The heart rate did not change significantly while body weight decreased to a similar extent in both groups. Urinary sodium excretion was similarly and significantly (P<0.01) reduced in both groups in the first 4 days (CS 100.8 ±7.9 and K/Na 100.2±11.0 mmol/24h, and remained unchanged in the CS group (109.9±4.3 mmol/24h) but declined significantly (P<0.05) by about 50% in the K/Na group (62.9±3.6 mmol/24h) in the following 8 days. Plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma noradrenaline did not differ significantly between the two groups, nor among the days of treatment, but the mean blood pressure response to mental stress was reduced significantly (P<0.4) in the Na/K group compared with the CS group. These findings indicate that a reduction in sodium intake, from about 100 to 50 mmol/day, linked with a small (20 mmol/day) potassium supplementation, can further reduce blood pressure in hypertensives whose blood pressure is already reduced but not normalized by a relatively low-sodium diet and/or by hospitalization. This haemodynamic response is linked to both a lack of stimulation of renin secretion and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity and to a reduced cardiovascular response to SNS stimulation as induced by mental stress.
Arzilli, F; Taddei, Stefano; Graziadei, L; Bichisao, E; Giovannetti, R; Salvetti, Antonio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/10897
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