Nature's material systems during evolution have developed the ability to respond and adapt to environmental stimuli through the generation of complex structures capable of varying their functions across direction, distances and time. 3D printing technologies can recapitulate structural motifs present in natural materials, and efforts are currently being made on the technological side to improve printing resolution, shape fidelity, and printing speed. However, an intrinsic limitation of this technology is that printed objects are static and thus inadequate to dynamically reshape when subjected to external stimuli. In recent years, this issue has been addressed with the design and precise deployment of smart materials that can undergo a programmed morphing in response to a stimulus. The term 4D printing was coined to indicate the combined use of additive manufacturing, smart materials, and careful design of appropriate geometries. In this review, we report the recent progress in the design and development of smart materials that are actuated by different stimuli and their exploitation within additive manufacturing to produce biomimetic structures with important repercussions in different but interrelated biomedical areas.

4D printing in biomedical applications: emerging trends and technologies

Chiesa I.
Co-primo
;
Micalizzi S.;De Maria C.
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Nature's material systems during evolution have developed the ability to respond and adapt to environmental stimuli through the generation of complex structures capable of varying their functions across direction, distances and time. 3D printing technologies can recapitulate structural motifs present in natural materials, and efforts are currently being made on the technological side to improve printing resolution, shape fidelity, and printing speed. However, an intrinsic limitation of this technology is that printed objects are static and thus inadequate to dynamically reshape when subjected to external stimuli. In recent years, this issue has been addressed with the design and precise deployment of smart materials that can undergo a programmed morphing in response to a stimulus. The term 4D printing was coined to indicate the combined use of additive manufacturing, smart materials, and careful design of appropriate geometries. In this review, we report the recent progress in the design and development of smart materials that are actuated by different stimuli and their exploitation within additive manufacturing to produce biomimetic structures with important repercussions in different but interrelated biomedical areas.
2021
Agarwal, T.; Hann, S. Y.; Chiesa, I.; Cui, H.; Celikkin, N.; Micalizzi, S.; Barbetta, A.; Costantini, M.; Esworthy, T.; Zhang, L. G.; De Maria, C.; Ma...espandi
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1119166
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 10
  • Scopus 62
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 56
social impact