How quantum information is scrambled in the global degrees of freedom of nonequilibrium many-body systems is a key question to understand local thermalization. A consequence of scrambling is that in the scaling limit the mutual information between two intervals vanishes at all times, i.e., it does not exhibit a peak at intermediate times. Here we investigate the mutual information scrambling after a quantum quench in both integrable and nonintegrable one-dimensional systems. We study the mutual information between two intervals of finite length as a function of their distance. In integrable systems, the mutual information exhibits an algebraic decay with the distance between the intervals, signaling weak scrambling. This behavior may be qualitatively understood within the quasiparticle picture for the entanglement spreading. In the scaling limit of large intervals, times, and distances between the intervals, with their ratios fixed, this predicts a decay exponent equal to 1/2. Away from the scaling limit, the power-law behavior persists, but with a larger (and model-dependent) exponent. For nonintegrable models, a much faster decay is observed, which can be attributed to the finite lifetime of the quasiparticles: unsurprisingly, nonintegrable models are better scramblers.

Quantum information scrambling after a quantum quench

Alba, V.;Calabrese, P.
2019

Abstract

How quantum information is scrambled in the global degrees of freedom of nonequilibrium many-body systems is a key question to understand local thermalization. A consequence of scrambling is that in the scaling limit the mutual information between two intervals vanishes at all times, i.e., it does not exhibit a peak at intermediate times. Here we investigate the mutual information scrambling after a quantum quench in both integrable and nonintegrable one-dimensional systems. We study the mutual information between two intervals of finite length as a function of their distance. In integrable systems, the mutual information exhibits an algebraic decay with the distance between the intervals, signaling weak scrambling. This behavior may be qualitatively understood within the quasiparticle picture for the entanglement spreading. In the scaling limit of large intervals, times, and distances between the intervals, with their ratios fixed, this predicts a decay exponent equal to 1/2. Away from the scaling limit, the power-law behavior persists, but with a larger (and model-dependent) exponent. For nonintegrable models, a much faster decay is observed, which can be attributed to the finite lifetime of the quasiparticles: unsurprisingly, nonintegrable models are better scramblers.
Alba, V.; Calabrese, P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/1140889
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