Purpose The COVID-19 outbreak has led to an increasing number of acute laryngotracheal complications in patients subjected to prolonged mechanical ventilation, but their incidence in the short and mid-term after ICU discharge is still unknown. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of these complications in a COVID-19 group of patients and to compare these aspects with non-COVID-19 matched controls. Methods In this cohort study, we retrospectively selected patients from November 1 to December 31, 2020, according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The follow-up visits were planned after 6 months from discharge. All patients were subjected to an endoscopic evaluation and completed two questionnaires (VHI-10 score and MDADI score). Results Thirteen men and three women were enrolled in the COVID-19 group while nine men and seven women were included in the control group. The median age was 60 [56-66] years in the COVID-19 group and 64 [58-69] years in the control group. All the patients of the control group showed no laryngotracheal lesions, while five COVID-19 patients had different types of lesions, two located in the vocal folds and three in the trachea. No difference was identified between the two groups regarding the VHI-10 score, while the control group showed a significantly worse MDADI score. Conclusions COVID-19 patients subjected to prolonged invasive ventilation are more likely to develop a laryngotracheal complication in the short and medium term. A rigorous clinical follow-up to allow early identification and management of these complications should be set up after discharge.

Incidence and types of laryngotracheal sequelae of prolonged invasive ventilation in COVID-19 patients

Fiacchini, Giacomo
Primo
;
Tricò, Domenico;Canelli, Rachele;Picariello, Miriana;Forfori, Francesco;Berrettini, Stefano
Penultimo
;
Bruschini, Luca
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Purpose The COVID-19 outbreak has led to an increasing number of acute laryngotracheal complications in patients subjected to prolonged mechanical ventilation, but their incidence in the short and mid-term after ICU discharge is still unknown. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of these complications in a COVID-19 group of patients and to compare these aspects with non-COVID-19 matched controls. Methods In this cohort study, we retrospectively selected patients from November 1 to December 31, 2020, according to specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The follow-up visits were planned after 6 months from discharge. All patients were subjected to an endoscopic evaluation and completed two questionnaires (VHI-10 score and MDADI score). Results Thirteen men and three women were enrolled in the COVID-19 group while nine men and seven women were included in the control group. The median age was 60 [56-66] years in the COVID-19 group and 64 [58-69] years in the control group. All the patients of the control group showed no laryngotracheal lesions, while five COVID-19 patients had different types of lesions, two located in the vocal folds and three in the trachea. No difference was identified between the two groups regarding the VHI-10 score, while the control group showed a significantly worse MDADI score. Conclusions COVID-19 patients subjected to prolonged invasive ventilation are more likely to develop a laryngotracheal complication in the short and medium term. A rigorous clinical follow-up to allow early identification and management of these complications should be set up after discharge.
Fiacchini, Giacomo; Abel, Joel Reuben; Tricò, Domenico; Ribechini, Alessandro; Canelli, Rachele; Picariello, Miriana; Guarracino, Fabio; Forfori, Francesco; Dallan, Iacopo; Berrettini, Stefano; Bruschini, Luca
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1150819
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