Background: Brain aging is associated with an excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation that causes cell injury through proteins oxidation and DNA damage. These changes have been identified as contributing factors in age-related memory decline. In this sense, treatments able to protect central nervous system (CNS) from oxidative stress and to sustain membrane plasticity, may represent new candidates to counter the development of aging effects. Several studies have indicated vitamin E, folic acid, magnesium and omega-3 as nutraceuticals protecting CNS from oxidative stress. Methods: A specific association of these active nutrients was tested in human cholinergic neurons, chosen as a cellular model related to learning and memory processes. Cortisol was used as an oxidative stress insult to explore the beneficial properties of the nutraceuticals. Results: In summary, the specific ratio of active ingredients in the above selected food supplement prevented the decrease in ATP content and in cell viability exerted by cortisol. At the same time, it prevented ROS formation, DNA damage, autophagy processes and decrease in the expression of cellular well-being genes induced by cell treatment with cortisol. The effects on ATP content, ROS formation and cellular viability were evidenced when the nutraceutical mix when administered following cortisol treatment, too. Notably, these peculiar evidences were significantly higher with respect to those elicited by the single components of the food supplement. Conclusions: Overall, these results confirm the beneficial effects of the simultaneous administration of vitamin E, folic acid, magnesium and omega-3.

A specific combination of nutraceutical Ingredients exerts cytoprotective effects in human cholinergic neurons

Simona Daniele
;
Lorenzo Ceccarelli;Elisa Chelucci;Claudia Martini
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Background: Brain aging is associated with an excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation that causes cell injury through proteins oxidation and DNA damage. These changes have been identified as contributing factors in age-related memory decline. In this sense, treatments able to protect central nervous system (CNS) from oxidative stress and to sustain membrane plasticity, may represent new candidates to counter the development of aging effects. Several studies have indicated vitamin E, folic acid, magnesium and omega-3 as nutraceuticals protecting CNS from oxidative stress. Methods: A specific association of these active nutrients was tested in human cholinergic neurons, chosen as a cellular model related to learning and memory processes. Cortisol was used as an oxidative stress insult to explore the beneficial properties of the nutraceuticals. Results: In summary, the specific ratio of active ingredients in the above selected food supplement prevented the decrease in ATP content and in cell viability exerted by cortisol. At the same time, it prevented ROS formation, DNA damage, autophagy processes and decrease in the expression of cellular well-being genes induced by cell treatment with cortisol. The effects on ATP content, ROS formation and cellular viability were evidenced when the nutraceutical mix when administered following cortisol treatment, too. Notably, these peculiar evidences were significantly higher with respect to those elicited by the single components of the food supplement. Conclusions: Overall, these results confirm the beneficial effects of the simultaneous administration of vitamin E, folic acid, magnesium and omega-3.
2022
Zappelli, Elisa; Daniele, Simona; Vergassola, Matteo; Ceccarelli, Lorenzo; Chelucci, Elisa; Mangano, Giorgina; Durando, Lucia; Ragni, Lorella; Martini, Claudia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1156372
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