Two studies were conducted to verify whether individuals who are high on need for cognitive closure (NFC) have a greater preference for consistency. NFC represents a personal aversion toward uncertainty that induces a desire for certain knowledge, order, and structure. As suggested by a recent theory and research on cognitive consistency, individuals who are high on NFC are uncomfortable with inconsistent information that can undermine their desire for certain knowledge. On the other hand, these individuals should prefer consistent information that can preserve epistemic certainty. Through two correlational studies, the present work confirms this assumption, identifying a high desire for consistency in individuals with high NFC.

When consistency is a virtue: effect of need for closure on preference for consistency

Daniela Di Santo
2020-01-01

Abstract

Two studies were conducted to verify whether individuals who are high on need for cognitive closure (NFC) have a greater preference for consistency. NFC represents a personal aversion toward uncertainty that induces a desire for certain knowledge, order, and structure. As suggested by a recent theory and research on cognitive consistency, individuals who are high on NFC are uncomfortable with inconsistent information that can undermine their desire for certain knowledge. On the other hand, these individuals should prefer consistent information that can preserve epistemic certainty. Through two correlational studies, the present work confirms this assumption, identifying a high desire for consistency in individuals with high NFC.
DI SANTO, Daniela
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1158354
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