Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a growing cause of chronic esophageal morbidity whose incidence and prevalence are increasing rapidly. The disease is characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates of the esophagus and organ dysfunction. Typical symptoms include dysphagia, chest pain, and bolus impaction, which are associated to mechanical obstructions in most patients. However, up to one in three EoE patients has no visible obstruction, suggesting that a motor disorder of the esophagus may underlie symptoms. Although potentially relevant for treatment refractoriness and symptomatic burden, esophageal dysmotility is often neglected when assessing EoE patients. The first systematic review investigating esophageal motility patterns in patients with EoE was published only recently. Accordingly, we reviewed the pathogenesis, assessment tools, manometric characteristics, and clinical implications of dysmotility in patients with EoE to highlight its clinical relevance. In summary, eosinophils can influence the amplitude of esophageal contractions via different mechanisms. The prevalence of dysmotility may increase with disease duration, possibly representing a late feature of EoE. Patients with EoE may display a wide range of motility disorders and possible disease-specific manometric pressurization patterns may be useful for raising a clinical suspicion. Intermittent dysmotility events have been found to correlate with symptoms on prolonged esophageal manometry, although high-resolution manometry studies have reported inconsistent results, possibly due to the suboptimal sensitivity of current manometry protocols. Motor abnormalities may recover following EoE treatment in a subset of patients, but invasive management of the motor disorder is required in some instances. In conclusion, esophageal motor abnormalities may have a role in eliciting symptoms, raising clinical suspicion, and influencing treatment outcome in EoE. The assessment of esophageal motility appears valuable in the EoE setting.

Esophageal dysmotility in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis: pathogenesis, assessment tools, manometric characteristics, and clinical implications

Visaggi, Pierfrancesco
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Venturini, Arianna
Formal Analysis
;
Stefani Donati, Delio
Methodology
;
Bellini, Massimo
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
de Bortoli, Nicola
Ultimo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a growing cause of chronic esophageal morbidity whose incidence and prevalence are increasing rapidly. The disease is characterized by eosinophilic infiltrates of the esophagus and organ dysfunction. Typical symptoms include dysphagia, chest pain, and bolus impaction, which are associated to mechanical obstructions in most patients. However, up to one in three EoE patients has no visible obstruction, suggesting that a motor disorder of the esophagus may underlie symptoms. Although potentially relevant for treatment refractoriness and symptomatic burden, esophageal dysmotility is often neglected when assessing EoE patients. The first systematic review investigating esophageal motility patterns in patients with EoE was published only recently. Accordingly, we reviewed the pathogenesis, assessment tools, manometric characteristics, and clinical implications of dysmotility in patients with EoE to highlight its clinical relevance. In summary, eosinophils can influence the amplitude of esophageal contractions via different mechanisms. The prevalence of dysmotility may increase with disease duration, possibly representing a late feature of EoE. Patients with EoE may display a wide range of motility disorders and possible disease-specific manometric pressurization patterns may be useful for raising a clinical suspicion. Intermittent dysmotility events have been found to correlate with symptoms on prolonged esophageal manometry, although high-resolution manometry studies have reported inconsistent results, possibly due to the suboptimal sensitivity of current manometry protocols. Motor abnormalities may recover following EoE treatment in a subset of patients, but invasive management of the motor disorder is required in some instances. In conclusion, esophageal motor abnormalities may have a role in eliciting symptoms, raising clinical suspicion, and influencing treatment outcome in EoE. The assessment of esophageal motility appears valuable in the EoE setting.
2022
Visaggi, Pierfrancesco; Ghisa, Matteo; Marabotto, Elisa; Venturini, Arianna; Stefani Donati, Delio; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Savarino, Edoardo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1160914
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