The intestinal barrier, which primarily consists of a mucus layer, an epithelial barrier, and a gut vascular barrier, has a crucial role in health and disease by facilitating nutrient absorption and preventing the entry of pathogens. The intestinal barrier is in close contact with gut microbiota on its luminal side and with enteric neurons and glial cells on its tissue side. Mounting evidence now suggests that the intestinal barrier is compromised not only in digestive disorders, but also in disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Parkinson's disease, autism spectrum disorder, depression, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. After providing an overview of the structure and functions of the intestinal barrier, we review existing preclinical and clinical studies supporting the notion that intestinal barrier dysfunction is present in neurological, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders. On the basis of this evidence, we discuss the mechanisms that possibly link gut barrier dysfunction and CNS disorders and the potential impact that evaluating enteric barriers in brain disorders could have on clinical practice, in terms of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, in the near future.

The intestinal barrier in disorders of the central nervous system

Pellegrini C.;Fornai M.;D'Antongiovanni V.;Antonioli L.
;
Bernardini N.;
2023-01-01

Abstract

The intestinal barrier, which primarily consists of a mucus layer, an epithelial barrier, and a gut vascular barrier, has a crucial role in health and disease by facilitating nutrient absorption and preventing the entry of pathogens. The intestinal barrier is in close contact with gut microbiota on its luminal side and with enteric neurons and glial cells on its tissue side. Mounting evidence now suggests that the intestinal barrier is compromised not only in digestive disorders, but also in disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), such as Parkinson's disease, autism spectrum disorder, depression, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. After providing an overview of the structure and functions of the intestinal barrier, we review existing preclinical and clinical studies supporting the notion that intestinal barrier dysfunction is present in neurological, neurodevelopmental, and psychiatric disorders. On the basis of this evidence, we discuss the mechanisms that possibly link gut barrier dysfunction and CNS disorders and the potential impact that evaluating enteric barriers in brain disorders could have on clinical practice, in terms of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, in the near future.
2023
Pellegrini, C.; Fornai, M.; D'Antongiovanni, V.; Antonioli, L.; Bernardini, N.; Derkinderen, P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1161420
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