Background: Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) is a lymphoproliferative disorder related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; anti-viral therapy is the first therapeutic option. CV can be incapacitating, compromising the patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a controlled study, interferon-based therapy was associated with a lower virological response in vasculitic patients than in patients without vasculitis. Limited, uncontrolled data on direct-acting anti-virals are available. Aim: To evaluate safety, clinical efficacy, virological response and the impact of interferon-free treatment on QoL in HCV patients with and without mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC). Methods: We prospectively studied HCV patients with cryoglobulinaemia (with vasculitis-CV- and without vasculitis-MC-) and without cryoglobulinaemia (controls), treated with direct-acting anti-virals. Hepato-virological parameters, CV clinical response and impact on QoL were assessed. Results: One hundred and eighty-two HCV patients were recruited (85 with CV, 54 with MC and 43 controls). A sustained virological response at 12 weeks (SVR12) was achieved in 166 (91.2%) patients (77/85 CV, 48/54 MC, 41/43 controls). In CV SVR patients, cryocrit levels progressively decreased and clinical response progressively improved, reaching 96.7%, 24 weeks after treatment. QoL, baseline physical and mental component summaries were lower in the CV group compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Scores improved in all groups, and significantly in CV patients after SVR. Conclusions: No significant differences in SVR rates were recorded between cryoglobulinaemic patients and controls and a high clinical and immunological efficacy was confirmed in CV, supporting the role of interferon-free therapy as the first therapeutic option. Interestingly, CV patients had worse baseline QoL than other HCV-positive groups and interferon-free therapy was effective in significantly increasing QoL, suggesting the important role of direct-acting anti-viral-based therapy in improving CV's individual and social burden.

Interferon-free therapy in hepatitis C virus mixed cryoglobulinaemia: a prospective, controlled, clinical and quality of life analysis

Gragnani L;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Background: Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis (CV) is a lymphoproliferative disorder related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; anti-viral therapy is the first therapeutic option. CV can be incapacitating, compromising the patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a controlled study, interferon-based therapy was associated with a lower virological response in vasculitic patients than in patients without vasculitis. Limited, uncontrolled data on direct-acting anti-virals are available. Aim: To evaluate safety, clinical efficacy, virological response and the impact of interferon-free treatment on QoL in HCV patients with and without mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC). Methods: We prospectively studied HCV patients with cryoglobulinaemia (with vasculitis-CV- and without vasculitis-MC-) and without cryoglobulinaemia (controls), treated with direct-acting anti-virals. Hepato-virological parameters, CV clinical response and impact on QoL were assessed. Results: One hundred and eighty-two HCV patients were recruited (85 with CV, 54 with MC and 43 controls). A sustained virological response at 12 weeks (SVR12) was achieved in 166 (91.2%) patients (77/85 CV, 48/54 MC, 41/43 controls). In CV SVR patients, cryocrit levels progressively decreased and clinical response progressively improved, reaching 96.7%, 24 weeks after treatment. QoL, baseline physical and mental component summaries were lower in the CV group compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Scores improved in all groups, and significantly in CV patients after SVR. Conclusions: No significant differences in SVR rates were recorded between cryoglobulinaemic patients and controls and a high clinical and immunological efficacy was confirmed in CV, supporting the role of interferon-free therapy as the first therapeutic option. Interestingly, CV patients had worse baseline QoL than other HCV-positive groups and interferon-free therapy was effective in significantly increasing QoL, suggesting the important role of direct-acting anti-viral-based therapy in improving CV's individual and social burden.
Gragnani, L; Cerretelli, G; Lorini, S; Steidl, C; Giovannelli, A; Monti, M; Petraccia, L; Sadalla, S; Urraro, T; Caini, P; Xheka, A; Simone, A; Arena, U; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Vergani, D; Laffi, G; Zignego, Al
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1163337
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