The gut–liver axis represents a current topic in human medicine. Extensive research investigates the gut microbiome (GM) modifications in relation to various kinds of chronic hepatobiliary diseases (CHD), with many mechanisms and therapeutical implications recognized. Those aspects in veterinary medicine are still quite unexplored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate GM in dogs diagnosed with CD. Comparison among CHD dogs were made considering some clinical and biochemical variables (lipemia and alanine–aminotransferase activities), presence of cholestasis or endocrine disorders, diet). Sixty-five dogs were prospectively enrolled with clinical and hematobiochemical evaluation and 16S-RNA GM sequencing assessed. Dogs that received antibiotics and/or pre/pro/symbiotics administration were excluded. Deeper GM alteration was observed between dogs with or without ultrasonographic and biochemical cholestatic CHD. Cholestasis was associated with a decrease in several bacterial taxa, including Clostridium hiranonis, Fusobacterium, Megamonas, Ruminococcus faecis, Turicibacter, and higher levels of Escherichia/Shigella and Serratia. Thus, the alteration in bile flow and composition, typical of cholestasis, may directly affect the local intestinal microbial environment. For the management of dogs with CHD and especially cholestatic CHD, clinicians should be aware that gut–liver interaction may lead to dysbiosis.

Intestinal Microbiome in Dogs with Chronic Hepatobiliary Disease: Can We Talk about the Gut–Liver Axis?

Habermaass, Verena
Primo
;
Olivero, Daniela;Gori, Eleonora;Mariti, Chiara
;
Marchetti, Veronica
Ultimo
2023-01-01

Abstract

The gut–liver axis represents a current topic in human medicine. Extensive research investigates the gut microbiome (GM) modifications in relation to various kinds of chronic hepatobiliary diseases (CHD), with many mechanisms and therapeutical implications recognized. Those aspects in veterinary medicine are still quite unexplored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate GM in dogs diagnosed with CD. Comparison among CHD dogs were made considering some clinical and biochemical variables (lipemia and alanine–aminotransferase activities), presence of cholestasis or endocrine disorders, diet). Sixty-five dogs were prospectively enrolled with clinical and hematobiochemical evaluation and 16S-RNA GM sequencing assessed. Dogs that received antibiotics and/or pre/pro/symbiotics administration were excluded. Deeper GM alteration was observed between dogs with or without ultrasonographic and biochemical cholestatic CHD. Cholestasis was associated with a decrease in several bacterial taxa, including Clostridium hiranonis, Fusobacterium, Megamonas, Ruminococcus faecis, Turicibacter, and higher levels of Escherichia/Shigella and Serratia. Thus, the alteration in bile flow and composition, typical of cholestasis, may directly affect the local intestinal microbial environment. For the management of dogs with CHD and especially cholestatic CHD, clinicians should be aware that gut–liver interaction may lead to dysbiosis.
2023
Habermaass, Verena; Olivero, Daniela; Gori, Eleonora; Mariti, Chiara; Longhi, Erika; Marchetti, Veronica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1208487
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