Cancer and cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF), are the main causes of death in Western countries. Several anticancer drugs and radiotherapy have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, promoting left ventricular dysfunction and ultimately HF. Nonetheless, the relationship between cancer and HF is likely not unidirectional. Indeed, cancer and HF share common risk factors, and both have a bidirectional relationship with systemic inflammation, metabolic disturbances, and neurohormonal and immune activation. Few studies have assessed the impact of untreated cancer on the heart. The presence of an active cancer has been associated with elevated cardiac biomarkers, an initial impairment of left ventricular structure and function, autonomic dysfunction, and reduced exercise tolerance. In turn, these conditions might increase the risk of cardiac damage from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. HF drugs such as beta-blockers or inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system might exert a protective effect on the heart even before the start of cancer therapies. In this review, we recapitulate the evidence of cardiac involvement in cancer patients naïve from chemotherapy and radiotherapy and no history of cardiac disease. We also focus on the perspectives for an early diagnosis and treatment to prevent the progression to cardiac dysfunction and clinical HF, and the potential benefits of cardioactive drugs on cancer progression.

Subclinical cardiac damage in cancer patients before chemotherapy

Aimo A.;Grigoratos C.;Vergaro G.;Pugliese N. R.;Taddei S.;Passino C.;Emdin M.;Giannoni A.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Cancer and cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF), are the main causes of death in Western countries. Several anticancer drugs and radiotherapy have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, promoting left ventricular dysfunction and ultimately HF. Nonetheless, the relationship between cancer and HF is likely not unidirectional. Indeed, cancer and HF share common risk factors, and both have a bidirectional relationship with systemic inflammation, metabolic disturbances, and neurohormonal and immune activation. Few studies have assessed the impact of untreated cancer on the heart. The presence of an active cancer has been associated with elevated cardiac biomarkers, an initial impairment of left ventricular structure and function, autonomic dysfunction, and reduced exercise tolerance. In turn, these conditions might increase the risk of cardiac damage from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. HF drugs such as beta-blockers or inhibitors of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system might exert a protective effect on the heart even before the start of cancer therapies. In this review, we recapitulate the evidence of cardiac involvement in cancer patients naïve from chemotherapy and radiotherapy and no history of cardiac disease. We also focus on the perspectives for an early diagnosis and treatment to prevent the progression to cardiac dysfunction and clinical HF, and the potential benefits of cardioactive drugs on cancer progression.
2021
Fabiani, I.; Panichella, G.; Aimo, A.; Grigoratos, C.; Vergaro, G.; Pugliese, N. R.; Taddei, S.; Cardinale, D. M.; Passino, C.; Emdin, M.; Giannoni, A.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1208895
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact