The first weeks of life represent a crucial stage for microbial colonization of the piglets’ gastrointestinal tract. Newborns’ microbiota is unstable and easily subject to changes under stimuli or insults. Nonetheless, the administration of antibiotics to the sow is still considered as common practice in intensive farming for pathological conditions in the postpartum. Therefore, transfer of antibiotic residues through milk may occurs, affecting the piglets’ colon microbiota. In this study, we aimed to extend the knowledge on antibiotic transfer through milk, employing an in vitro dedicated piglet colon model (MICODE— Multi Unit In vitro Colon Model). The authors’ focus was set on the shifts of the piglets’ microbiota composition microbiom- ics (16S r-DNA MiSeq and qPCR—quantitative polymerase chain reaction) and on the production of microbial metabolites (SPME GC/MS—solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) in response to milk with different concentrations of amoxicillin. The results showed an effective influence of amoxicillin in piglets’ microbiota and metabolites production; however, without altering the overall biodiversity. The scenario is that of a limitation of pathogens and opportun- istic taxa, e.g., Staphylococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, but also a limitation of commensal dominant Lactobacillaceae, a reduction in commensal Ruminococcaceae and a depletion in beneficial Bifidobactericeae. Lastly, an incremental growth of resistant species, such as Enterococcaceae or Clostridiaceae, was observed. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first evaluating the impact of antibiotic residues towards the piglets’ colon microbiota in an in vitro model, opening the way to include such approach in a pipeline of experiments where a reduced number of animals for testing is employed.

Maternal amoxicillin affects piglets colon microbiota: microbial ecology and metabolomics in a gut model

Elmi, Alberto;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The first weeks of life represent a crucial stage for microbial colonization of the piglets’ gastrointestinal tract. Newborns’ microbiota is unstable and easily subject to changes under stimuli or insults. Nonetheless, the administration of antibiotics to the sow is still considered as common practice in intensive farming for pathological conditions in the postpartum. Therefore, transfer of antibiotic residues through milk may occurs, affecting the piglets’ colon microbiota. In this study, we aimed to extend the knowledge on antibiotic transfer through milk, employing an in vitro dedicated piglet colon model (MICODE— Multi Unit In vitro Colon Model). The authors’ focus was set on the shifts of the piglets’ microbiota composition microbiom- ics (16S r-DNA MiSeq and qPCR—quantitative polymerase chain reaction) and on the production of microbial metabolites (SPME GC/MS—solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) in response to milk with different concentrations of amoxicillin. The results showed an effective influence of amoxicillin in piglets’ microbiota and metabolites production; however, without altering the overall biodiversity. The scenario is that of a limitation of pathogens and opportun- istic taxa, e.g., Staphylococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, but also a limitation of commensal dominant Lactobacillaceae, a reduction in commensal Ruminococcaceae and a depletion in beneficial Bifidobactericeae. Lastly, an incremental growth of resistant species, such as Enterococcaceae or Clostridiaceae, was observed. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first evaluating the impact of antibiotic residues towards the piglets’ colon microbiota in an in vitro model, opening the way to include such approach in a pipeline of experiments where a reduced number of animals for testing is employed.
2022
Nissen, Lorenzo; Aniballi, Camilla; Casciano, Flavia; Elmi, Alberto; Ventrella, Domenico; Zannoni, Augusta; Gianotti, Andrea; Bacci, Maria Laura
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1213878
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