Despite the controversial results of liver transplantation (LT) in elderly recipients, the proportion of patients continues to increase. This study investigated the outcome of LT in elderly patients (>= 65 years) in an Italian, multicenter cohort. Between January 2014 and December 2019, 693 eligible patients were transplanted, and two groups were compared: recipients >= 65 years (n = 174, 25.1%) versus 50-59 years (n = 519, 74.9%). Confounders were balanced using a stabilized inverse probability therapy weighting (IPTW). Elderly patients showed more frequent early allograft dysfunction (23.9 versus 16.8%, p = 0.04). Control patients had longer posttransplant hospital stays (median: 14 versus 13 days; p = 0.02), while no difference was observed for posttransplant complications (p = 0.20). At multivariable analysis, recipient age >= 65 years was an independent risk factor for patient death (HR 1.76; p = 0.002) and graft loss (HR 1.63; p = 0.005). The 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year patient survival rates were 82.6, 79.8, and 66.4% versus 91.1, 88.5, and 82.0% in the elderly and control group, respectively (log-rank p = 0.001). The 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year graft survival rates were 81.5, 78.7, and 66.0% versus 90.2, 87.2, and 79.9% in the elderly and control group, respectively (log-rank p = 0.003). Elderly patients with CIT > 420 min showed 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year patient survival rates of 75.7%, 72.8%, and 58.5% versus 90.4%, 86.5%, and 79.4% for controls (log-rank p = 0.001). LT in elderly (>= 65 years) recipients provides favorable results, but inferior to those achieved in younger patients (50-59), especially when CIT > 7 h. Containment of cold ischemia time seems pivotal for favorable outcomes in this class of patients.

Outcome of liver transplantation in elderly patients: an Italian multicenter case-control study

Lai, Quirino;Ghinolfi, Davide;De Simone, Paolo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Despite the controversial results of liver transplantation (LT) in elderly recipients, the proportion of patients continues to increase. This study investigated the outcome of LT in elderly patients (>= 65 years) in an Italian, multicenter cohort. Between January 2014 and December 2019, 693 eligible patients were transplanted, and two groups were compared: recipients >= 65 years (n = 174, 25.1%) versus 50-59 years (n = 519, 74.9%). Confounders were balanced using a stabilized inverse probability therapy weighting (IPTW). Elderly patients showed more frequent early allograft dysfunction (23.9 versus 16.8%, p = 0.04). Control patients had longer posttransplant hospital stays (median: 14 versus 13 days; p = 0.02), while no difference was observed for posttransplant complications (p = 0.20). At multivariable analysis, recipient age >= 65 years was an independent risk factor for patient death (HR 1.76; p = 0.002) and graft loss (HR 1.63; p = 0.005). The 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year patient survival rates were 82.6, 79.8, and 66.4% versus 91.1, 88.5, and 82.0% in the elderly and control group, respectively (log-rank p = 0.001). The 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year graft survival rates were 81.5, 78.7, and 66.0% versus 90.2, 87.2, and 79.9% in the elderly and control group, respectively (log-rank p = 0.003). Elderly patients with CIT > 420 min showed 3-month, 1-year, and 5-year patient survival rates of 75.7%, 72.8%, and 58.5% versus 90.4%, 86.5%, and 79.4% for controls (log-rank p = 0.001). LT in elderly (>= 65 years) recipients provides favorable results, but inferior to those achieved in younger patients (50-59), especially when CIT > 7 h. Containment of cold ischemia time seems pivotal for favorable outcomes in this class of patients.
2023
Melandro, Fabio; Lai, Quirino; Ghinolfi, Davide; Manzia, Tommaso Maria; Spoletini, Gabriele; Rossi, Massimo; Agnes, Salvatore; Tisone, Giuseppe; De Simone, Paolo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/1221010
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