A study is reported in which the significance for vision of low- and high-spatial-frequency components of photographic positive and negative images was investigated by measuring recognition of bandpass-filtered photographs of faces. The results show that a 1.5 octave bandpass-filtered image contains sufficient visual information for good recognition performance, provided the filter is centred close to 20 cycles facewidth-1. At low spatial frequencies negatives are more difficult to recognize than positives, but at high spatial frequencies there is no difference in recognition, implying that it is the low-frequency components of negatives which present difficulties for the visual system.

Recognition of positive and negative bandpass-filtered images.

MORRONE, MARIA CONCETTA;
1986

Abstract

A study is reported in which the significance for vision of low- and high-spatial-frequency components of photographic positive and negative images was investigated by measuring recognition of bandpass-filtered photographs of faces. The results show that a 1.5 octave bandpass-filtered image contains sufficient visual information for good recognition performance, provided the filter is centred close to 20 cycles facewidth-1. At low spatial frequencies negatives are more difficult to recognize than positives, but at high spatial frequencies there is no difference in recognition, implying that it is the low-frequency components of negatives which present difficulties for the visual system.
Hayes, T; Morrone, MARIA CONCETTA; Burr, Dc
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/12375
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