Concentrations of interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R) have been suggested as a marker of rejection episodes after organ transplantation. To evaluate the analytical performance of a ''sandwich-type'' enzyme immunoassay method for sIL-2R and to verify whether increased concentrations of sIL-2R might be a useful marker of allograft rejection, we quantified sIL-2R in serum samples from heart- or kidney-transplant patients. The mean (±SD) pre-transplant value of sIL-2R (592 ± 209 kilo-units/L) in heart-transplant patients was significantly higher (P <0.01) than that observed in controls (350 ± 101 kilo-units/L). After heart transplantation, the concentrations of sIL-2R slowly decreased to baseline in successfully treated patients but increased significantly (1129 ± 215 kilo-units/L; P <0.01) during acute rejection crisis. However, severe infections were also associated with a significant increase of sIL-2R, so the sIL-2R test is not specific for allograft rejection. The mean pre-transplant concentration of sIL-2R was also increaesed (1943 ± 878 kilo-units/L) in 26 renal-transplant patients; after transplantation, this value returned to normal, as did that for creatinine, but persisted steadily high in five patients who experienced acute tubular necrosis. In this group of patients, the sIL-2R concentration increased by 1.5- to fourfold, both during acute rejection episodes and in clinically evident infection; thus measurement of creatinine and sIL-2R concentrations can help to distinguish between rejection, infection, and cyclosporine toxicity. In two episodes of mild cyclosporine-induced nephrotoxicity, we observed slight increases in serum creatinine (which returned to baseline when the cyclosporine dose was decreased) not associated with an increase in sIL-2R. We conclude that systematic monitoring of sIL-2R together with other biochemical and clinical markers may be useful in the management of kidney-transplant patients.

INCREASED CIRCULATING CONCENTRATIONS OF INTERLEUKIN-2 RECEPTOR DURING REJECTION EPISODES IN HEART-TRANSPLANT OR KIDNEY-TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

DI STEFANO, ROSSELLA;
1990

Abstract

Concentrations of interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2R) have been suggested as a marker of rejection episodes after organ transplantation. To evaluate the analytical performance of a ''sandwich-type'' enzyme immunoassay method for sIL-2R and to verify whether increased concentrations of sIL-2R might be a useful marker of allograft rejection, we quantified sIL-2R in serum samples from heart- or kidney-transplant patients. The mean (±SD) pre-transplant value of sIL-2R (592 ± 209 kilo-units/L) in heart-transplant patients was significantly higher (P <0.01) than that observed in controls (350 ± 101 kilo-units/L). After heart transplantation, the concentrations of sIL-2R slowly decreased to baseline in successfully treated patients but increased significantly (1129 ± 215 kilo-units/L; P <0.01) during acute rejection crisis. However, severe infections were also associated with a significant increase of sIL-2R, so the sIL-2R test is not specific for allograft rejection. The mean pre-transplant concentration of sIL-2R was also increaesed (1943 ± 878 kilo-units/L) in 26 renal-transplant patients; after transplantation, this value returned to normal, as did that for creatinine, but persisted steadily high in five patients who experienced acute tubular necrosis. In this group of patients, the sIL-2R concentration increased by 1.5- to fourfold, both during acute rejection episodes and in clinically evident infection; thus measurement of creatinine and sIL-2R concentrations can help to distinguish between rejection, infection, and cyclosporine toxicity. In two episodes of mild cyclosporine-induced nephrotoxicity, we observed slight increases in serum creatinine (which returned to baseline when the cyclosporine dose was decreased) not associated with an increase in sIL-2R. We conclude that systematic monitoring of sIL-2R together with other biochemical and clinical markers may be useful in the management of kidney-transplant patients.
Zucchelli, Gc; Clerico, A; Demaria, R; Carmellini, M; DI STEFANO, Rossella; Masini, S; Pilo, A; Donato, L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/12832
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