BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatic lipotoxicity results from and contributes to obesity-related disorders. It is a challenge to study human metabolism of fatty acids (FAs) in the liver. We combined (11)C-palmitate imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) with compartmental modeling to determine rates of hepatic FA uptake, oxidation, and storage, as well as triglyceride release in pigs and human beings. METHODS: Anesthetized pigs underwent (11)C-palmitate PET imaging during fasting (n = 3) or euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (n = 3). Metabolic products of FAs were measured in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood. The imaging methodology then was tested in 15 human subjects (8 obese subjects); plasma (11)C-palmitate kinetic analyses were used to quantify systemic and visceral lipolysis. RESULTS: In pigs, PET-derived and corresponding measured FA fluxes (FA uptake, esterification, and triglyceride FA release) did not differ and were correlated with each other. In human beings, obese subjects had increased hepatic FA oxidation compared with controls (mean +/- standard error of the mean, 0.16 +/- 0.01 vs 0.08 +/- 0.01 mu mol/min/mL; P = .0007); FA uptake and esterification rates did not differ between obese subjects and controls. Liver FA oxidation correlated with plasma insulin levels (r = 0.61, P = .016), adipose tissue (r = 0.58, P = .024), and systemic insulin resistance (r = 0.62, P = .015). Hepatic FA esterification correlated with the systemic release of FA into plasma (r = 0.71, P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: PET imaging can be used to measure FA metabolism in the liver. By using this technology, we found that obese individuals have increased hepatic oxidation of FA, in the context of adipose tissue insulin resistance, and increased FA flux from visceral fat. FA flux from visceral fat is proportional with the mass of the corresponding depot.

Fatty Acid Metabolism in the Liver, Measured by Positron Emission Tomography, Is Increased in Obese Individuals RID C-5130-2009

FERRANNINI, ELEUTERIO;
2010-01-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatic lipotoxicity results from and contributes to obesity-related disorders. It is a challenge to study human metabolism of fatty acids (FAs) in the liver. We combined (11)C-palmitate imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) with compartmental modeling to determine rates of hepatic FA uptake, oxidation, and storage, as well as triglyceride release in pigs and human beings. METHODS: Anesthetized pigs underwent (11)C-palmitate PET imaging during fasting (n = 3) or euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (n = 3). Metabolic products of FAs were measured in arterial, portal, and hepatic venous blood. The imaging methodology then was tested in 15 human subjects (8 obese subjects); plasma (11)C-palmitate kinetic analyses were used to quantify systemic and visceral lipolysis. RESULTS: In pigs, PET-derived and corresponding measured FA fluxes (FA uptake, esterification, and triglyceride FA release) did not differ and were correlated with each other. In human beings, obese subjects had increased hepatic FA oxidation compared with controls (mean +/- standard error of the mean, 0.16 +/- 0.01 vs 0.08 +/- 0.01 mu mol/min/mL; P = .0007); FA uptake and esterification rates did not differ between obese subjects and controls. Liver FA oxidation correlated with plasma insulin levels (r = 0.61, P = .016), adipose tissue (r = 0.58, P = .024), and systemic insulin resistance (r = 0.62, P = .015). Hepatic FA esterification correlated with the systemic release of FA into plasma (r = 0.71, P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: PET imaging can be used to measure FA metabolism in the liver. By using this technology, we found that obese individuals have increased hepatic oxidation of FA, in the context of adipose tissue insulin resistance, and increased FA flux from visceral fat. FA flux from visceral fat is proportional with the mass of the corresponding depot.
2010
Iozzo, P; Bucci, M; Roivainen, A; Nagren, K; Jarvisalo, Mj; Kiss, J; Guiducci, L; Fielding, B; Naum, Ag; Borra, R; Virtanen, K; Savunen, T; Salvadori, Pa; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Knuuti, J; Nuutila, P.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/142481
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