The strong hunting pressure on the red-legged partridge, Alectoris rufa, warranted its inclusion into the list of species of European conservation concern. During the last decades, restocking plans with farmed specimens have counterbalanced the hunting drawings from wild populations. Our concern was the study of A. rufa in the easternmost part of its range, the central Italy, to gain insights into the effects of this compensation practice on the genetic structure of its populations. Partridges from both a geographically isolated, long-time protected, wild population (Pianosa island, Tuscan Archipelago National Park) and two Tuscan farms (Bieri and Scarlino) were investigated. All the specimens were very similar in outward appearance, looking much like to A. rufa. Ninety-six sequences of both Cytochrome b and D-loop Control Region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were analysed to get evidence of ancestry at the population level, whereas, the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was employed to get fingerprinting at the individual level. Pianosa and Bieri populations showed both the A. rufa and Alectoris chukar mtDNA lineages, whereas the Scarlino one only the A. rufa-mtDNA line. However, a spread overall pattern of A. rufa · A. chukar hybridisation among specimens, whatever their mtDNA lineage could result to be, was disclosed by means of RAPD species-specific markers. This is the first genetically documented record of the A. rufa · A. chukar hybrids. The occurrence of the pure, native A. rufa genome in the easternmost part of the species geographical range may be guessed to be virtual.

Analysis of the genetic structure of red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa, Galliformes) populations by means of mitochondrial DNA and RAPD markers: a study from central Italy

BARBANERA, FILIPPO;DI GIUSEPPE, GRAZIANO;DINI, FERNANDO
2005

Abstract

The strong hunting pressure on the red-legged partridge, Alectoris rufa, warranted its inclusion into the list of species of European conservation concern. During the last decades, restocking plans with farmed specimens have counterbalanced the hunting drawings from wild populations. Our concern was the study of A. rufa in the easternmost part of its range, the central Italy, to gain insights into the effects of this compensation practice on the genetic structure of its populations. Partridges from both a geographically isolated, long-time protected, wild population (Pianosa island, Tuscan Archipelago National Park) and two Tuscan farms (Bieri and Scarlino) were investigated. All the specimens were very similar in outward appearance, looking much like to A. rufa. Ninety-six sequences of both Cytochrome b and D-loop Control Region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were analysed to get evidence of ancestry at the population level, whereas, the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was employed to get fingerprinting at the individual level. Pianosa and Bieri populations showed both the A. rufa and Alectoris chukar mtDNA lineages, whereas the Scarlino one only the A. rufa-mtDNA line. However, a spread overall pattern of A. rufa · A. chukar hybridisation among specimens, whatever their mtDNA lineage could result to be, was disclosed by means of RAPD species-specific markers. This is the first genetically documented record of the A. rufa · A. chukar hybrids. The occurrence of the pure, native A. rufa genome in the easternmost part of the species geographical range may be guessed to be virtual.
Barbanera, Filippo; J. J., Negro; DI GIUSEPPE, Graziano; F., Bertoncini; F., Cappelli; Dini, Fernando
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/179258
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