Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa causing gastritis and peptic ulcer and increasing the risk of gastric cancer. The efficacy of current antibiotic-based therapies can be limited by problems of patient compliance and increasing antibiotic resistance; the vaccine approach can overcome these limits. The present study describes the therapeutic vaccination of experimentally H. pylori-infected beagle dogs, an animal model that reproduces several aspects of the human infection with H. pylori. The vaccine consisted of three recombinant H. pylori antigens, CagA, VacA, and NAP, formulated at different doses (10, 25, or 50 mug each) with alum and administered intramuscularly either weekly or monthly. No adverse effects were observed after vaccination and a good immunoglobulin G response was generated against each of the three antigens. Bacterial colonization and gastritis were decreased after the completion of the vaccination cycle, especially in the case of the monthly immunization schedule. In conclusion, therapeutic vaccination in the beagle dog model was safe and immunogenic and was able to limit H. pylori colonization and the related gastric pathology.

Therapeutic vaccination against Helicobacter pylori in the beagle dog experimental model: safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy

CORAZZA, MICHELE;TACCINI, ENNIO;
2004

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric mucosa causing gastritis and peptic ulcer and increasing the risk of gastric cancer. The efficacy of current antibiotic-based therapies can be limited by problems of patient compliance and increasing antibiotic resistance; the vaccine approach can overcome these limits. The present study describes the therapeutic vaccination of experimentally H. pylori-infected beagle dogs, an animal model that reproduces several aspects of the human infection with H. pylori. The vaccine consisted of three recombinant H. pylori antigens, CagA, VacA, and NAP, formulated at different doses (10, 25, or 50 mug each) with alum and administered intramuscularly either weekly or monthly. No adverse effects were observed after vaccination and a good immunoglobulin G response was generated against each of the three antigens. Bacterial colonization and gastritis were decreased after the completion of the vaccination cycle, especially in the case of the monthly immunization schedule. In conclusion, therapeutic vaccination in the beagle dog model was safe and immunogenic and was able to limit H. pylori colonization and the related gastric pathology.
Rossi, G.; Ruggiero, P.; Peppoloni, S.; Pancotto, L.; Fortuna, D.; Lauretti, L.; Volpini, G.; Mancianti, S.; Corazza, Michele; Taccini, Ennio; DI PISA, F.; Rappuoli, R.; DEL GIUDICE, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/187474
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