Liver diseases are frequently observed in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This organ is thought to play a significant role in the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) due to its frequent involvement in secondary and opportunistic infections and neoplasm, while a direct role of HIV in the production of liver pathology remains an unresolved possibility. Since feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been recognised as a suitable animal model which may help to understand the pathogenesis of HIV infection, we studied the alterations observed in the liver of naturally and experimentally FIVinfected cats. Fibrosis was observed in 96% and 92% of naturally and experimentally FIV-infected cats, respectively. Hepatic stellate cells and Kupffer cells hyperplasia, intracellular cholestasis and mild non-specific inflammatory infiltrates were also detectable in FIV-infected animals. Opportunistic infections, centrolobular fibrosis associated with perilobular steatosis, stasis, and cholestasis were the most common histopathological liver alterations revealed in HIV-infected patients. Moreover, although in lesser degree, liver iron deposits, Kupffer cells hyperplasia, and increase in hepatic stellate cell lipids within the centrolobular area were also described. As the liver features observed in experimentally FIV-infected cats maintained in an isolation unit resembled those described in HIV-infected patients, FIV infection may represent a valuable model to better understand the impact of these lentiviruses on liver function and the role of liver cells in the pathogenesis of AIDS.

Liver pathology in cats naturally and experimentally infected by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

POLI, ALESSANDRO;ABRAMO, FRANCESCA;BENDINELLI, MAURO
2000

Abstract

Liver diseases are frequently observed in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This organ is thought to play a significant role in the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) due to its frequent involvement in secondary and opportunistic infections and neoplasm, while a direct role of HIV in the production of liver pathology remains an unresolved possibility. Since feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been recognised as a suitable animal model which may help to understand the pathogenesis of HIV infection, we studied the alterations observed in the liver of naturally and experimentally FIVinfected cats. Fibrosis was observed in 96% and 92% of naturally and experimentally FIV-infected cats, respectively. Hepatic stellate cells and Kupffer cells hyperplasia, intracellular cholestasis and mild non-specific inflammatory infiltrates were also detectable in FIV-infected animals. Opportunistic infections, centrolobular fibrosis associated with perilobular steatosis, stasis, and cholestasis were the most common histopathological liver alterations revealed in HIV-infected patients. Moreover, although in lesser degree, liver iron deposits, Kupffer cells hyperplasia, and increase in hepatic stellate cell lipids within the centrolobular area were also described. As the liver features observed in experimentally FIV-infected cats maintained in an isolation unit resembled those described in HIV-infected patients, FIV infection may represent a valuable model to better understand the impact of these lentiviruses on liver function and the role of liver cells in the pathogenesis of AIDS.
Poli, Alessandro; Boldorini, R; Abramo, Francesca; Tosoni, A; Nebuloni, M; Costanzi, G; Bendinelli, Mauro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/190672
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