Cardiovascular complications caused by an accelerated atherosclerotic disease represent the largest single cause of mortality in chronic renal failure patients. The rapidly developing atherosclerosis of the uremic syndrome appears to be caused by a synergism of different mechanisms, such as malnutrition, oxidative stress and genetic factors. Recent studies provide evidence that chronic inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of experiencing myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in apparently healthy subjects. Several recently published pa pers have confirmed this strong association between CRP and the extent and severity of the atherosclerotic processes. In patients affected by predialytic renal failure, increased levels of CRP and interleukin (IL)-6 were recorded in 25% of our population; CRP and IL-6 were inversely related with renal function. These data suggest the activation - even in the predialytic phase of renal failure - of mechanisms known to contribute to the enhanced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the uremic syndrome. In recent years we have investigated the hypothesis that the chronic inflammatory state of the uremic patient could at least in part be due to the dialytic technique. We provide evidence suggesting that the increase of CRP in stable dialytic patients may be due to the stimulation of monocyte/macrophage by backfiltration of dialysate contaminants. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

C-reactive protein as a marker of chronic inflammation in uremic patients

PANICHI, VINCENZO;GIOVANNINI, LUCA;
2000

Abstract

Cardiovascular complications caused by an accelerated atherosclerotic disease represent the largest single cause of mortality in chronic renal failure patients. The rapidly developing atherosclerosis of the uremic syndrome appears to be caused by a synergism of different mechanisms, such as malnutrition, oxidative stress and genetic factors. Recent studies provide evidence that chronic inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated serum levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of experiencing myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death in apparently healthy subjects. Several recently published pa pers have confirmed this strong association between CRP and the extent and severity of the atherosclerotic processes. In patients affected by predialytic renal failure, increased levels of CRP and interleukin (IL)-6 were recorded in 25% of our population; CRP and IL-6 were inversely related with renal function. These data suggest the activation - even in the predialytic phase of renal failure - of mechanisms known to contribute to the enhanced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of the uremic syndrome. In recent years we have investigated the hypothesis that the chronic inflammatory state of the uremic patient could at least in part be due to the dialytic technique. We provide evidence suggesting that the increase of CRP in stable dialytic patients may be due to the stimulation of monocyte/macrophage by backfiltration of dialysate contaminants. Copyright (C) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Panichi, Vincenzo; Migliori, M; De Pietro, S; Taccola, D; Bianchi, Am; Norpoth, M; Giovannini, Luca; Palla, R; Tetta, C.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/191348
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 43
social impact