Abstract OBJECTIVE: Nutritional status and lifestyle can have profound effects on health. To analyse behaviour patterns in population subgroups of public health importance, we compared lifestyle, dietary intake of energy and selected nutrients, and nutritional biomarkers of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) patients and nondiabetic first-degree relatives against control subjects with no family history of T1DM. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. SUBJECTS: A total of 209 individuals including 38 type 1 patients, 76 relatives, and 95 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: We used the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition questionnaires to assess dietary intake and lifestyle. Anthropometric indices and nutritional biomarkers (such as plasma levels of albumin, iron, lipids, homocysteine, vitamin B9 and vitamin B12 as well as urinary outputs of nitrogen, sodium and potassium) were evaluated. RESULTS: Emerging health issues: (1) In total, 45% of controls were overweight. Increasing age was associated with increasing body mass and decreasing activity in sport in front of an unchanged energy intake. (2) The distribution of energy sources was incorrect. The proportion of caloric intake derived from total fat and cholesterol did not match general guidelines. Total dietary fibre consumption was assessed to be adequate (25 g/day) in only 27% of all the participants. (3) Estimated daily intakes of water-soluble vitamin B9 and fat-soluble vitamin D and vitamin E were deficient in comparison with dietary reference intakes. (4) The prevalence of adoption and maintenance of healthful eating and physical activity habits was higher in women and T1DM patients (probably as a consequence of the medical educational intervention). On the contrary, supportiveness of the family in term of changing the undesirable behaviours at home seemed to fail. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides first evidence indicating unhealthy dietary behaviours, which could even predispose to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular complications, in subjects living in Pisa. The combination of vitamin B9 and vitamin E deprivation could be deleterious for endothelial function, since these antioxidants have been implicated in the modulation of nitric oxide and eicosanoid signalling.

Dietary habits and nutritional biomarkers in Italian type 1 diabetes families: evidence of unhealthy diet and combined-vitamin-deficient intakes.

MATTEUCCI, ELENA;GIAMPIETRO, OTTAVIO
2005-01-01

Abstract

Abstract OBJECTIVE: Nutritional status and lifestyle can have profound effects on health. To analyse behaviour patterns in population subgroups of public health importance, we compared lifestyle, dietary intake of energy and selected nutrients, and nutritional biomarkers of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) patients and nondiabetic first-degree relatives against control subjects with no family history of T1DM. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pisa, Italy. SUBJECTS: A total of 209 individuals including 38 type 1 patients, 76 relatives, and 95 healthy subjects. INTERVENTIONS: We used the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer and Nutrition questionnaires to assess dietary intake and lifestyle. Anthropometric indices and nutritional biomarkers (such as plasma levels of albumin, iron, lipids, homocysteine, vitamin B9 and vitamin B12 as well as urinary outputs of nitrogen, sodium and potassium) were evaluated. RESULTS: Emerging health issues: (1) In total, 45% of controls were overweight. Increasing age was associated with increasing body mass and decreasing activity in sport in front of an unchanged energy intake. (2) The distribution of energy sources was incorrect. The proportion of caloric intake derived from total fat and cholesterol did not match general guidelines. Total dietary fibre consumption was assessed to be adequate (25 g/day) in only 27% of all the participants. (3) Estimated daily intakes of water-soluble vitamin B9 and fat-soluble vitamin D and vitamin E were deficient in comparison with dietary reference intakes. (4) The prevalence of adoption and maintenance of healthful eating and physical activity habits was higher in women and T1DM patients (probably as a consequence of the medical educational intervention). On the contrary, supportiveness of the family in term of changing the undesirable behaviours at home seemed to fail. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides first evidence indicating unhealthy dietary behaviours, which could even predispose to the development of diabetes and cardiovascular complications, in subjects living in Pisa. The combination of vitamin B9 and vitamin E deprivation could be deleterious for endothelial function, since these antioxidants have been implicated in the modulation of nitric oxide and eicosanoid signalling.
Matteucci, Elena; Passerai, S.; Mariotti, M.; Fagnani, F.; Evangelista, I.; Rossi, L.; Giampietro, Ottavio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/199276
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