BACKGROUND: Overweight in adolescence predicts adverse health effects in adulthood. We carried out a primary school health program and assessed children's growth and body composition. METHODS: Were screened 869 (448 M, 421 F) primary school children: height, weight, four skinfolds, and four circumferences were measured. A family-reported questionnaire was used to determine family composition, history, and lifestyle. RESULTS: Age was 118 +/- 5 months, BMI 18 +/- 3 kg/m(2). No difference by gender was observed as for BMI or blood pressure. Girls had higher skinfold thickness at the biceps (BCF), triceps (TCF), subscapular (SSF), and suprailiac (SIF) areas (P < 0.001), hip and thigh circumferences (P < 0.01), body fat percentage (P < 0.001). Boys had higher waist circumference (P < 0.01), waist/thigh ratio, and conicity index (P < 0.001). Offspring BMI was correlated with birth weight (P < 0.05), parental BMI and scholarship level (P < 0.001), children blood pressure (P < 0.001), and hours per day spent in television viewing (P < 0.01). Family history for diabetes was associated with higher BMI, SSF, waist circumference (P < 0.05), and upper thigh (P < 0.01). Family history for hypertension was associated with higher SSF/TCF ratio (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Three of 869 children had BMI >30 kg/m(2) (2 boys and 1 girl), 33 had BMI >25 kg/m(2) (17 boys and 16 girls). The percentages of children who could be considered overweight (BMI >/=95(th) percentile of age- and sex-specific NHANES I reference data) were boys, 10.0%, and girls, 9.3%. Anthropometric and anamnestic data on child and family yield more accurate estimates of risk profile: fat distribution seems relevant for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.

Anthropometric indices of school children and familiar risk factors.

GIAMPIETRO, OTTAVIO;MATTEUCCI, ELENA
2002

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Overweight in adolescence predicts adverse health effects in adulthood. We carried out a primary school health program and assessed children's growth and body composition. METHODS: Were screened 869 (448 M, 421 F) primary school children: height, weight, four skinfolds, and four circumferences were measured. A family-reported questionnaire was used to determine family composition, history, and lifestyle. RESULTS: Age was 118 +/- 5 months, BMI 18 +/- 3 kg/m(2). No difference by gender was observed as for BMI or blood pressure. Girls had higher skinfold thickness at the biceps (BCF), triceps (TCF), subscapular (SSF), and suprailiac (SIF) areas (P < 0.001), hip and thigh circumferences (P < 0.01), body fat percentage (P < 0.001). Boys had higher waist circumference (P < 0.01), waist/thigh ratio, and conicity index (P < 0.001). Offspring BMI was correlated with birth weight (P < 0.05), parental BMI and scholarship level (P < 0.001), children blood pressure (P < 0.001), and hours per day spent in television viewing (P < 0.01). Family history for diabetes was associated with higher BMI, SSF, waist circumference (P < 0.05), and upper thigh (P < 0.01). Family history for hypertension was associated with higher SSF/TCF ratio (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Three of 869 children had BMI >30 kg/m(2) (2 boys and 1 girl), 33 had BMI >25 kg/m(2) (17 boys and 16 girls). The percentages of children who could be considered overweight (BMI >/=95(th) percentile of age- and sex-specific NHANES I reference data) were boys, 10.0%, and girls, 9.3%. Anthropometric and anamnestic data on child and family yield more accurate estimates of risk profile: fat distribution seems relevant for metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.
Giampietro, Ottavio; Virgone, E; Carneglia, L; Griesi, E; Calvi, D; Matteucci, Elena
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/199313
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