Immunogenicity and protective activity of four cell-based feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccines prepared with autologous lymphoblasts were investigated. One vaccine was composed of FIV-infected cells that were paraformaldehyde fixed at the peak of viral expression. The other vaccines were attempts to maximize the expression of protective epitopes that might become exposed as a result of virion binding to cells and essentially consisted of cells mildly fixed after saturation of their surface with adsorbed, internally inactivated FIV particles. The levels of FIV-specific lymphoproliferation exhibited by the vaccinees were comparable to the ones previously observed in vaccine-protected cats, but antibodies were largely directed to cell-derived constituents rather than to truly viral epitopes and had very poor FIV-neutralizing activity. Moreover, under one condition of testing, some vaccine sera enhanced FIV replication in vitro. As a further limit, the vaccines proved inefficient at priming animals for anamnestic immune responses. Two months after completion of primary immunization, the animals were challenged with a low dose of homologous ex vivo FIV. Collectively, 8 of 20 vaccinees developed infection versus one of nine animals mock immunized with fixed uninfected autologous lymphoblasts. After a boosting and rechallenge with a higher virus dose, all remaining animals became infected, thus confirming their lack of protection.

AIDS vaccination studies using an ex vivo feline immunodeficiency virus model: Failure to protect and possible enhancement of challenge infection by four cell-based vaccines prepared with autologous lymphoblasts

MATTEUCCI, DONATELLA
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
PISTELLO, MAURO
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
BENDINELLI, MAURO
Writing – Review & Editing
2002

Abstract

Immunogenicity and protective activity of four cell-based feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccines prepared with autologous lymphoblasts were investigated. One vaccine was composed of FIV-infected cells that were paraformaldehyde fixed at the peak of viral expression. The other vaccines were attempts to maximize the expression of protective epitopes that might become exposed as a result of virion binding to cells and essentially consisted of cells mildly fixed after saturation of their surface with adsorbed, internally inactivated FIV particles. The levels of FIV-specific lymphoproliferation exhibited by the vaccinees were comparable to the ones previously observed in vaccine-protected cats, but antibodies were largely directed to cell-derived constituents rather than to truly viral epitopes and had very poor FIV-neutralizing activity. Moreover, under one condition of testing, some vaccine sera enhanced FIV replication in vitro. As a further limit, the vaccines proved inefficient at priming animals for anamnestic immune responses. Two months after completion of primary immunization, the animals were challenged with a low dose of homologous ex vivo FIV. Collectively, 8 of 20 vaccinees developed infection versus one of nine animals mock immunized with fixed uninfected autologous lymphoblasts. After a boosting and rechallenge with a higher virus dose, all remaining animals became infected, thus confirming their lack of protection.
Giannecchini, S; Isola, P; Sichi, O; Matteucci, Donatella; Pistello, Mauro; Zaccaro, L; DEL MAURO, D; Bendinelli, Mauro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/199320
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