Background- Albuminuria and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic low-grade inflammation, are frequently elevated in essential hypertension and predict cardiovascular prognosis independent of conventional risk factors. However, in spite of their potentially important links, the interrelationships between the 2 parameters have not been explored in depth in hypertensive patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Albuminuria (the mean of 3 overnight urine collections), high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP), 24-hour blood pressure (BP), weight, lipids, poststimulative (75 g PO) plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin sensitivity by the homeostasis model assessment model were evaluated in 220 never treated, nondiabetic, uncomplicated essential hypertensive men. Albuminuria > or =15 microg/min was defined as microalbuminuria and hs-CRP values above and below median (2.3 mg/L) as high and low, respectively. Concentric left ventricular hypertrophy was diagnosed by echocardiography, and a full-blown metabolic syndrome was identified in presence of hypertension and at least 3 of following: obesity, subclinical hyperglycemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and high triglycerides. Microalbuminuria was present in 54 patients, 29 with high hs-CRP characterized by higher 24-hour systolic BP, postload glucose, body mass index, lower HDL cholesterol, more frequent metabolic syndrome, concentric LVH, and active smoking than those with either isolated microalbuminuria (n=27) or normoalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS: Microalbuminuria accompanied by evidence of subclinical inflammation is a strong correlate of metabolic abnormalities in essential hypertension and identifies a patient subset at very high cardiovascular risk. In contrast, isolated microalbuminuria may represent a distinct pathophysiological condition characterized by a more benign profile and possibly a better prognosis.

Low.grade inflammation and microalbuminuria in hypertension

PEDRINELLI, ROBERTO;DI BELLO, VITANTONIO;DEL PRATO, STEFANO;PENNO G.
2004

Abstract

Background- Albuminuria and C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic low-grade inflammation, are frequently elevated in essential hypertension and predict cardiovascular prognosis independent of conventional risk factors. However, in spite of their potentially important links, the interrelationships between the 2 parameters have not been explored in depth in hypertensive patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Albuminuria (the mean of 3 overnight urine collections), high-sensitive CRP (hs-CRP), 24-hour blood pressure (BP), weight, lipids, poststimulative (75 g PO) plasma glucose, insulin, and insulin sensitivity by the homeostasis model assessment model were evaluated in 220 never treated, nondiabetic, uncomplicated essential hypertensive men. Albuminuria > or =15 microg/min was defined as microalbuminuria and hs-CRP values above and below median (2.3 mg/L) as high and low, respectively. Concentric left ventricular hypertrophy was diagnosed by echocardiography, and a full-blown metabolic syndrome was identified in presence of hypertension and at least 3 of following: obesity, subclinical hyperglycemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and high triglycerides. Microalbuminuria was present in 54 patients, 29 with high hs-CRP characterized by higher 24-hour systolic BP, postload glucose, body mass index, lower HDL cholesterol, more frequent metabolic syndrome, concentric LVH, and active smoking than those with either isolated microalbuminuria (n=27) or normoalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS: Microalbuminuria accompanied by evidence of subclinical inflammation is a strong correlate of metabolic abnormalities in essential hypertension and identifies a patient subset at very high cardiovascular risk. In contrast, isolated microalbuminuria may represent a distinct pathophysiological condition characterized by a more benign profile and possibly a better prognosis.
Pedrinelli, Roberto; Dell'Omo, G; DI BELLO, Vitantonio; Pellegrini, G; Pucci, L; DEL PRATO, Stefano; Penno, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/199329
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