Endurance horses, like marathon runners, undertake sub-maximal, longterm physical exercises and in both cases thermoregulation plays a critical role. A standardised sub-maximal treadmill test was used to assess fitness and training state in endurance horses. Literature reports that trained human athletes dissipate head load better than not trained ones; in this study parameters related to thermoregulation were recorded together with other haematologic and metabolic ones. Six endurance horses, divided into two groups according to their training state, performed two submaximal tests at a distance of one week. Blood samples were collected at rest, during exercise, at the end and during recovery (10, 30 and 60 minutes after work). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal (RT) and skin (ST) temperatures were monitored through the exercise (and recovery for HR). HR resulted significantly lower (P<0.01) in trained horses than in untrained ones, especially during recovery. Also rectal and skin temperatures resulted significantly lower (P<0.05) in trained horses and ST increased more gradually during exercise. The values of haematocrit and haemoglobin resulted significantly lower (P<0.05) at rest, during exercise and recovery samples. In this study, the parameters related to thermoregulation, in accordance with data from human athletes, resulted significantly different in trained and untrained horses, while other parameters didn't vary significantly between the two groups. Thermoregulatory responses to exercise-generated heat load in a standardised test, studied by simple parameters, can thus offer useful information about fitness and training state of endurance horses.

Valutazione dello stato di allenamento del cavallo da endurance mediante test standardizzato su treadmill

GATTA, DOMENICO;BARAGLI, PAOLO;SIGHIERI, CLAUDIO;
1998

Abstract

Endurance horses, like marathon runners, undertake sub-maximal, longterm physical exercises and in both cases thermoregulation plays a critical role. A standardised sub-maximal treadmill test was used to assess fitness and training state in endurance horses. Literature reports that trained human athletes dissipate head load better than not trained ones; in this study parameters related to thermoregulation were recorded together with other haematologic and metabolic ones. Six endurance horses, divided into two groups according to their training state, performed two submaximal tests at a distance of one week. Blood samples were collected at rest, during exercise, at the end and during recovery (10, 30 and 60 minutes after work). Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), rectal (RT) and skin (ST) temperatures were monitored through the exercise (and recovery for HR). HR resulted significantly lower (P<0.01) in trained horses than in untrained ones, especially during recovery. Also rectal and skin temperatures resulted significantly lower (P<0.05) in trained horses and ST increased more gradually during exercise. The values of haematocrit and haemoglobin resulted significantly lower (P<0.05) at rest, during exercise and recovery samples. In this study, the parameters related to thermoregulation, in accordance with data from human athletes, resulted significantly different in trained and untrained horses, while other parameters didn't vary significantly between the two groups. Thermoregulatory responses to exercise-generated heat load in a standardised test, studied by simple parameters, can thus offer useful information about fitness and training state of endurance horses.
Gatta, Domenico; Baragli, Paolo; Ferrarini, N; Ciattini, F; Sighieri, Claudio; Colombani, B.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/201682
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