BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to establish to what degree variation in lifetime experience of rhythmicity and manic-hypomanic features correlates with suicidality in individuals with mood disorders and other major psychiatric diagnoses and in a comparison group of controls. METHOD: Suicidal ideation and attempts were investigated in a clinical sample, including 77 patients with schizophrenia, 60 with borderline personality disorder, 61 with bipolar disorder, 88 with unipolar depression, and 57 with panic disorder, and in a comparison group of 102 controls. Using information derived from the diagnostic interview and a self-report assessment of mood spectrum symptoms, subjects were assigned to 3 categories according to the maximum level of suicidality achieved in the lifetime (none, ideation/plans, and suicide attempts). The association of categorical and continuous variables with suicidality levels was investigated using multinomial logistic regression models. RESULTS: Suicidal ideation and plans were more common in unipolar depression (50%) and bipolar disorder (42.4%) than in borderline personality disorder (30%), whereas the reverse was true for suicidal attempts. In each of the study groups, the number and the type of mood spectrum items endorsed, including depressive and manic-hypomanic items and rhythmicity and vegetative symptoms, were associated with increased levels of suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the assessment of lifetime rhythmicity and manic-hypomanic features may be clinically useful to identify potential suicide attempters in high-risk groups.

Lifetime rhythmicity and mania as correlates of suicidal ideation and attempts in mood disorders.

RUCCI, PAOLA;DELL'OSSO, LILIANA;CASSANO, GIOVANNI BATTISTA
2006

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to establish to what degree variation in lifetime experience of rhythmicity and manic-hypomanic features correlates with suicidality in individuals with mood disorders and other major psychiatric diagnoses and in a comparison group of controls. METHOD: Suicidal ideation and attempts were investigated in a clinical sample, including 77 patients with schizophrenia, 60 with borderline personality disorder, 61 with bipolar disorder, 88 with unipolar depression, and 57 with panic disorder, and in a comparison group of 102 controls. Using information derived from the diagnostic interview and a self-report assessment of mood spectrum symptoms, subjects were assigned to 3 categories according to the maximum level of suicidality achieved in the lifetime (none, ideation/plans, and suicide attempts). The association of categorical and continuous variables with suicidality levels was investigated using multinomial logistic regression models. RESULTS: Suicidal ideation and plans were more common in unipolar depression (50%) and bipolar disorder (42.4%) than in borderline personality disorder (30%), whereas the reverse was true for suicidal attempts. In each of the study groups, the number and the type of mood spectrum items endorsed, including depressive and manic-hypomanic items and rhythmicity and vegetative symptoms, were associated with increased levels of suicidality. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the assessment of lifetime rhythmicity and manic-hypomanic features may be clinically useful to identify potential suicide attempters in high-risk groups.
Balestrieri, M; Rucci, Paola; Sbrana, A; Ravani, L; Benvenuti, A; Gonnelli, C; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Cassano, GIOVANNI BATTISTA
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/202002
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