Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration eta between two test bodies-of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass-if the measurement is made to the level of eta similar or equal to 10(-13) or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation-in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)-can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics.

Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei rotor for a Ground test of the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes

CHIOFALO, MARIA LUISA;NOBILI, ANNA MARIA
2006

Abstract

Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration eta between two test bodies-of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass-if the measurement is made to the level of eta similar or equal to 10(-13) or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation-in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)-can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics.
Comandi, Gl; Chiofalo, MARIA LUISA; Toncelli, R; Bramanti, D; Polacco, E; Nobili, ANNA MARIA
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/203184
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