Regular physical exercise has emerged, together with dietary restriction, as an effective intervention in delaying degenerative diseases and augmenting life span in rodents. The mechanisms involved remain largely unknown, although a beneficial influence on the age-related alteration of insulin sensitivity has been hypothesized. As muscle triglyceride (TG) accumulation is considered a reliable index of muscle insulin resistance, in this study we explored muscle TG content in 23-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to life-long training. Plasma glucose. insulin. free fatty acid (FFA) and leptin levels were also measured. Both voluntary running in wheels (RW) and forced training in treadmill (TM) were studied. As RW rats weighed less than controls, a cohort of untrained animals, fed to pair weight (PW) with RW, was added to discriminate the effect of exercise from that of food restriction. Sedentary ad libitum fed rats served as controls. In 23-month-old RW rats. muscle TG content was reduced by 50% with respect to age-matched sedentary controls, while in TM group this reduction was smaller but still highly significant, and occurred independently on the changes in body fat mass. In both the trained rat groups, there was a significant decrease in circulating FFA levels and a trend to reduced insulin levels. In PW rats, muscle TG levels decreased similarly to RW rats, while plasma parameters were less modified. In particular, RW training was more effective than PW in preventing the age-related increase in circulating leptin levels. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise effectively counteracts the development of insulin resistance in the muscles of ageing rats as well as other related changes such as hyperlipacidaemia and compensatory hyperleptinaemia. Forced training or moderate food restriction appear slightly less effective than voluntary exercise in preventing age-dependent alterations in nutrient distribution and/or utilization. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Effects of life-long exercise on circulating free fatty acids and muscle triglyceride content in ageing rats.

NOVELLI, MICHELA;BERGAMINI, ETTORE;MASIELLO, PELLEGRINO
2004

Abstract

Regular physical exercise has emerged, together with dietary restriction, as an effective intervention in delaying degenerative diseases and augmenting life span in rodents. The mechanisms involved remain largely unknown, although a beneficial influence on the age-related alteration of insulin sensitivity has been hypothesized. As muscle triglyceride (TG) accumulation is considered a reliable index of muscle insulin resistance, in this study we explored muscle TG content in 23-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to life-long training. Plasma glucose. insulin. free fatty acid (FFA) and leptin levels were also measured. Both voluntary running in wheels (RW) and forced training in treadmill (TM) were studied. As RW rats weighed less than controls, a cohort of untrained animals, fed to pair weight (PW) with RW, was added to discriminate the effect of exercise from that of food restriction. Sedentary ad libitum fed rats served as controls. In 23-month-old RW rats. muscle TG content was reduced by 50% with respect to age-matched sedentary controls, while in TM group this reduction was smaller but still highly significant, and occurred independently on the changes in body fat mass. In both the trained rat groups, there was a significant decrease in circulating FFA levels and a trend to reduced insulin levels. In PW rats, muscle TG levels decreased similarly to RW rats, while plasma parameters were less modified. In particular, RW training was more effective than PW in preventing the age-related increase in circulating leptin levels. Our results suggest that voluntary exercise effectively counteracts the development of insulin resistance in the muscles of ageing rats as well as other related changes such as hyperlipacidaemia and compensatory hyperleptinaemia. Forced training or moderate food restriction appear slightly less effective than voluntary exercise in preventing age-dependent alterations in nutrient distribution and/or utilization. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Novelli, Michela; Pocai, A; Skalicky, M; Viidik, A; Bergamini, Ettore; Masiello, Pellegrino
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/203853
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