High turfgrass wear resistance and recovery are the most sought after characteristics in turfgrass species when used for sports turf, but they are also very important in home gardens and public parks. Several wear resistance investigations have been conducted in field conditions in recent years, but these investigations involved the use of machinery and techniques that are not able to segregate the plant wounding and death effects from soil compaction effects that are generally associated with turfgrass wear. The same can be said of wear recovery investigations, with an extensive use of agronomical machinery for field trials. This study focussed on the wear resistance and recovery of mature swards of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var.dactylonC. transvaalensis Burt-Davy cv. Tifway 419, Zoysia matrella (L.) Merr. cv. Zeon and Paspalum vaginatum Swartz. cv. Salam and a typical sports-type mix of Lolium perenne L. (cvv. Speedster 35% and Greenway 35%) + Poa pratensis L. (cvv. SR2100 15% and Greenknight 15%). The goal of this trial was to evaluate turfgrass wear resistance and recovery devoid of climatic and soil effects and thus, sward growing, wear simulation and recovery were conducted in controlled environment. Furthermore, wear simulation was conducted with FIFA-approved, numerical control machinery (Lisport). Wear resistance and recovery data was plotted against results from laboratory investigations on key tissue constituents. Zoysia matrella proved to be the most wear resistant, but the slowest in recovery, whereas the bermudagrass hybrid showed the exact opposite behaviour. Lignin and carbohydrate concentrations proved to be the two factors most closely correlated with wear resistance and recovery respectively. These two classes of compounds were present in an equilibrium that was species specific, with a frequent mutual exclusion between lignin and starch concentrations that deserves further investigation at the intra-specific level.

Physiological and morphological factors influencing wear resistance and recovery in C3 and C4 turfgrass species

VOLTERRANI, MARCO;GROSSI, NICOLA;GUGLIELMINETTI, LORENZO
2012

Abstract

High turfgrass wear resistance and recovery are the most sought after characteristics in turfgrass species when used for sports turf, but they are also very important in home gardens and public parks. Several wear resistance investigations have been conducted in field conditions in recent years, but these investigations involved the use of machinery and techniques that are not able to segregate the plant wounding and death effects from soil compaction effects that are generally associated with turfgrass wear. The same can be said of wear recovery investigations, with an extensive use of agronomical machinery for field trials. This study focussed on the wear resistance and recovery of mature swards of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. var.dactylonC. transvaalensis Burt-Davy cv. Tifway 419, Zoysia matrella (L.) Merr. cv. Zeon and Paspalum vaginatum Swartz. cv. Salam and a typical sports-type mix of Lolium perenne L. (cvv. Speedster 35% and Greenway 35%) + Poa pratensis L. (cvv. SR2100 15% and Greenknight 15%). The goal of this trial was to evaluate turfgrass wear resistance and recovery devoid of climatic and soil effects and thus, sward growing, wear simulation and recovery were conducted in controlled environment. Furthermore, wear simulation was conducted with FIFA-approved, numerical control machinery (Lisport). Wear resistance and recovery data was plotted against results from laboratory investigations on key tissue constituents. Zoysia matrella proved to be the most wear resistant, but the slowest in recovery, whereas the bermudagrass hybrid showed the exact opposite behaviour. Lignin and carbohydrate concentrations proved to be the two factors most closely correlated with wear resistance and recovery respectively. These two classes of compounds were present in an equilibrium that was species specific, with a frequent mutual exclusion between lignin and starch concentrations that deserves further investigation at the intra-specific level.
Filippo, Lulli; Volterrani, Marco; Grossi, Nicola; Roberto, Armeni; Sara, Stefanini; Guglielminetti, Lorenzo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/204514
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