Microalbuminuria (an increased urinary albumin excretion that is not detectable by the usual dipstick methods for macroproteinuria) predicts cardiovascular events in essential hypertensive patients. A possible reason for this behavior is that albumin leaks through exaggeratedly permeant glomeruli exposed to the damaging impact of subclinical atherogenesis. To evaluate this possibility, the transcapillary escape rate of albumin (TER(alb), the 1-hour decline rate of intravenous (125)I-albumin), a parameter that estimates the integrity of systemic capillary permeability, albuminuria, blood pressure, echocardiographic left ventricular mass, lipids, and body mass index were measured in 73 uncomplicated, glucose-tolerant men with essential hypertension and normal renal function; 53 were normoalbuminuric, and 20 were microalbuminuric. Twenty-one normotensive age-matched male subjects were the controls. TER(alb) was higher in hypertensives, a behavior explained in part by a positive correlation with blood pressure values, although body mass index, lipids, and left ventricular mass showed no association. Transcapillary albumin leakage values did not differ between normoalbuminuric and microalbuminuric patients and were unrelated to albuminuria. Blood pressure, particularly systolic, and cardiac mass were higher in microalbuminuric patients in whom albuminuria correlated with both cardiovascular variables and indicated the influence of the hemodynamic load on urinary albumin levels. Thus, TER(alb), a parameter influenced by the permeability surface area product for macromolecules and the filtration power across the vascular wall, is altered in essential hypertensives. However, this abnormality is dissociated from the amount of albuminuria, which is contrary to the hypothesis that a higher albumin excretion reflects a greater degree of systemic microvascular damage in essential hypertension.

Microalbuminuria and transvascular albumin leakage in essential hypertension

PEDRINELLI, ROBERTO;PENNO G;DI BELLO, VITANTONIO;
1999

Abstract

Microalbuminuria (an increased urinary albumin excretion that is not detectable by the usual dipstick methods for macroproteinuria) predicts cardiovascular events in essential hypertensive patients. A possible reason for this behavior is that albumin leaks through exaggeratedly permeant glomeruli exposed to the damaging impact of subclinical atherogenesis. To evaluate this possibility, the transcapillary escape rate of albumin (TER(alb), the 1-hour decline rate of intravenous (125)I-albumin), a parameter that estimates the integrity of systemic capillary permeability, albuminuria, blood pressure, echocardiographic left ventricular mass, lipids, and body mass index were measured in 73 uncomplicated, glucose-tolerant men with essential hypertension and normal renal function; 53 were normoalbuminuric, and 20 were microalbuminuric. Twenty-one normotensive age-matched male subjects were the controls. TER(alb) was higher in hypertensives, a behavior explained in part by a positive correlation with blood pressure values, although body mass index, lipids, and left ventricular mass showed no association. Transcapillary albumin leakage values did not differ between normoalbuminuric and microalbuminuric patients and were unrelated to albuminuria. Blood pressure, particularly systolic, and cardiac mass were higher in microalbuminuric patients in whom albuminuria correlated with both cardiovascular variables and indicated the influence of the hemodynamic load on urinary albumin levels. Thus, TER(alb), a parameter influenced by the permeability surface area product for macromolecules and the filtration power across the vascular wall, is altered in essential hypertensives. However, this abnormality is dissociated from the amount of albuminuria, which is contrary to the hypothesis that a higher albumin excretion reflects a greater degree of systemic microvascular damage in essential hypertension.
Pedrinelli, Roberto; Penno, G; Dell'Omo, G; Bandinelli, S; Giorgi, V; DI BELLO, Vitantonio; Navalesi, R; Mariani, M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/205398
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