Background: The paper presents a post-hoc analysis of the intensity of dyslipidaemia care operated in the first 2 years of Multiple-Intervention-in-type-2-Diabetes.ITaly (MIND.IT) study.Design and methods: MIND.IT is a multicentric, randomized, two-parallel arm trial involving 1461 type 2 diabetic patients at high cardiovascular (CV) risk. The study compares the usual care (UC) of CV prevention with a multifactorial intensive care (IC) approach aiming at achieving target values for the main CV risk factors according to a step-wise treat-to-target approach.Results: Proportion of patients on target for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was about 10% at baseline and increased significantly more with IC than UC (43 vs. 27%; p < 0.001). However, the majority (57%) of patients, in this intended intensively treated cohort, failed to achieve the proposed target. Average LDL-C decreased from 144 ± 35 to 108 ± 31 mg/dl with IC and from 142 ± 28 to 118 ± 32 with UC (p-for-interaction <0.0001). IC was associated with a significantly greater increase in statin prescription and lower withdrawal from treatment than UC (43 vs. 11% and 28 vs. 61%, respectively; both p < 0.001). However, the new treatments were characterized in both groups by the use of low starting doses (≤10 mg of atorvastatin, equivalent dose in more than 90% of patients) without increase in case of missed target.Conclusions: The application of a multifactorial treat-to-target intervention is associated with a significant improvement in LDL-C beyond usual practice. However, the change in LDL-C appears to be more related to an increased number of treated patients and a decreased treatment withdrawal than to a true treat-to-target approach.

Effectiveness of treat-to-target strategy for LDL-cholesterol control in type 2 diabetes: post-hoc analysis of data from the MIND.IT study.

MICCOLI, ROBERTO;
2014

Abstract

Background: The paper presents a post-hoc analysis of the intensity of dyslipidaemia care operated in the first 2 years of Multiple-Intervention-in-type-2-Diabetes.ITaly (MIND.IT) study.Design and methods: MIND.IT is a multicentric, randomized, two-parallel arm trial involving 1461 type 2 diabetic patients at high cardiovascular (CV) risk. The study compares the usual care (UC) of CV prevention with a multifactorial intensive care (IC) approach aiming at achieving target values for the main CV risk factors according to a step-wise treat-to-target approach.Results: Proportion of patients on target for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) was about 10% at baseline and increased significantly more with IC than UC (43 vs. 27%; p < 0.001). However, the majority (57%) of patients, in this intended intensively treated cohort, failed to achieve the proposed target. Average LDL-C decreased from 144 ± 35 to 108 ± 31 mg/dl with IC and from 142 ± 28 to 118 ± 32 with UC (p-for-interaction <0.0001). IC was associated with a significantly greater increase in statin prescription and lower withdrawal from treatment than UC (43 vs. 11% and 28 vs. 61%, respectively; both p < 0.001). However, the new treatments were characterized in both groups by the use of low starting doses (≤10 mg of atorvastatin, equivalent dose in more than 90% of patients) without increase in case of missed target.Conclusions: The application of a multifactorial treat-to-target intervention is associated with a significant improvement in LDL-C beyond usual practice. However, the change in LDL-C appears to be more related to an increased number of treated patients and a decreased treatment withdrawal than to a true treat-to-target approach.
Ardigò, D; Vaccaro, O; Cavalot, F; Rivellese, Aa; Franzini, L; Miccoli, Roberto; Patti, L; Boemi, M; Trovati, M; Zavaroni, I.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/245771
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