Shared activities are known to create a good relationship between dog and man. Therefore, it can be expected that animals working in harness with their handlers, such as search and rescue dogs, show a higher attachment to man.The aim of the current research was to assess whether there are differences between pet and working dogs in the attachment to owners/handlers.Forty dogs were involved, 26 pets and 14 search and rescue dogs (taken home when not working). Their attachment to owners/handlers was analyzed by using a modified version of the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test and a recall test, while owners and handlers filled in a questionnaire and were scored on the Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale.Statistical analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between pet and working dogs for behaviors indicating an attachment bond: behavior oriented to door/chair/shoe during the absence of owner/handler (which represents " search of absent person" ; U = 132.000, P = 0.156), contact with/proximity to owner/handler (i.e., " contact maintenance effect" ; U = 157.000, P = 0.478), whining during owner's/handler's absence (" protest at the separation" ; U = 147.000, P = 0.288), and individual play (U = 146.000, P = 0.288) and exploration (U = 138.500, P = 0.215) in presence of owner/handler, representing the " secure base effect." Despite the lack of statistical differences, the formulated hypothesis may be not completely rejected, as a trend of a higher attachment in search and rescue dogs existed. It can be

Dog attachment to man: a comparison between pet and working dogs

MARITI, CHIARA;SIGHIERI, CLAUDIO;GAZZANO, ANGELO
2013

Abstract

Shared activities are known to create a good relationship between dog and man. Therefore, it can be expected that animals working in harness with their handlers, such as search and rescue dogs, show a higher attachment to man.The aim of the current research was to assess whether there are differences between pet and working dogs in the attachment to owners/handlers.Forty dogs were involved, 26 pets and 14 search and rescue dogs (taken home when not working). Their attachment to owners/handlers was analyzed by using a modified version of the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test and a recall test, while owners and handlers filled in a questionnaire and were scored on the Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale.Statistical analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between pet and working dogs for behaviors indicating an attachment bond: behavior oriented to door/chair/shoe during the absence of owner/handler (which represents " search of absent person" ; U = 132.000, P = 0.156), contact with/proximity to owner/handler (i.e., " contact maintenance effect" ; U = 157.000, P = 0.478), whining during owner's/handler's absence (" protest at the separation" ; U = 147.000, P = 0.288), and individual play (U = 146.000, P = 0.288) and exploration (U = 138.500, P = 0.215) in presence of owner/handler, representing the " secure base effect." Despite the lack of statistical differences, the formulated hypothesis may be not completely rejected, as a trend of a higher attachment in search and rescue dogs existed. It can be
Mariti, Chiara; Ricci, E.; Carlone, B.; Moore, J. L.; Sighieri, Claudio; Gazzano, Angelo
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/246043
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