Background. A point prevalence survey (PPS) was conducted in Italy in 2010, as part of the first European PPS in Long Term Care Facilities (LTCFs), conducted within the HALT Project. Methods. The PPS was aimed at estimating the prevalence of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and antibiotic use and to assess the status of infections control programs in this setting. Results. Ninety two LTCFs, located in 11 different Italian regions, participated to the study: 9391 residents were enrolled, 9285 of whom were eligible according to the study criteria. The prevalence of residents with signs/symptoms of infection was 6.5% (606 residents); 438 residents were on antimicrobial treatment (4.7%) and 526 had signs/symptoms (5.7%) but in 324 residents only (3.5/100 residents) the infection satisfied the modified McGeer criteria and was considered confirmed. The most frequent infection site was the respiratory tract (1.27/100 residents). Mostly of the antibiotics were prescribed for respiratory tract infections (42.8% of the antibiotics) and for urinary tract infections (26.6%). The most frequently prescribed classes were quinolones, followed by penicillin plus beta-lactamase inhibitor and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Few infection had a microbiological confirmation, but among the 143 isolated microorganisms 24% were multidrug resistant. Conclusions. The burden of infections and antimicrobial resistance in LTCFs is significant and infection control and surveillance program are urgently needed.

Infections and antimicrobial resistance in long term care facilities: a national prevalence study.

PRIVITERA, GAETANO PIERPAOLO;
2013

Abstract

Background. A point prevalence survey (PPS) was conducted in Italy in 2010, as part of the first European PPS in Long Term Care Facilities (LTCFs), conducted within the HALT Project. Methods. The PPS was aimed at estimating the prevalence of infections, antimicrobial resistance, and antibiotic use and to assess the status of infections control programs in this setting. Results. Ninety two LTCFs, located in 11 different Italian regions, participated to the study: 9391 residents were enrolled, 9285 of whom were eligible according to the study criteria. The prevalence of residents with signs/symptoms of infection was 6.5% (606 residents); 438 residents were on antimicrobial treatment (4.7%) and 526 had signs/symptoms (5.7%) but in 324 residents only (3.5/100 residents) the infection satisfied the modified McGeer criteria and was considered confirmed. The most frequent infection site was the respiratory tract (1.27/100 residents). Mostly of the antibiotics were prescribed for respiratory tract infections (42.8% of the antibiotics) and for urinary tract infections (26.6%). The most frequently prescribed classes were quinolones, followed by penicillin plus beta-lactamase inhibitor and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Few infection had a microbiological confirmation, but among the 143 isolated microorganisms 24% were multidrug resistant. Conclusions. The burden of infections and antimicrobial resistance in LTCFs is significant and infection control and surveillance program are urgently needed.
Moro, Ml; Ricchizzi, E; Morsillo, F; Marchi, M; Puro, V; Zotti, Cm; Prato, R; Privitera, GAETANO PIERPAOLO; Poli, A; Mura, I; Fedeli, U.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/257938
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