We measured wet mass (MM), linear dimensions, and fiber length (FL) for each antebrachial muscle and calculated physiological cross sectional area (PCSA) for six strepsirrhines, six platyrrhines and seven catarrhines spanning nearly the entire primate body size range (from Galago to Gorilla). These variables were studied for each muscle and across muscles groups (flexors, extensors, and “others” – i.e., supinator, pronators, etc.) using RMA regression (alpha = 0.05). Total forearm (TFor) PCSA is tightly correlated with TFor MM across the whole sample and within each suborder and is slightly positively allometric across the whole sample and within strepsirrhines and catarrhines (but not platyrrhines). Similar correlations and allometry between MM and PCSA are found within the flexor and extensor compartments. However, FL is not highly correlated with total MM variables and instead correlates with locomotor patterns. Thus primate forearm muscles have relatively consistent (though slightly positively allometric) crossections, but vary according to FL, suggesting locomotor adaptations in stretch and flexibility, but not force production. Therefore the variation in the anatomy of the epicondyle likely relates to adaptations for mechanical advantage and not muscle force as has been previously hypothesized.

Correlation of forearm muscle architecture and locomotion patterns in primates

MARCHI, DAMIANO
2013

Abstract

We measured wet mass (MM), linear dimensions, and fiber length (FL) for each antebrachial muscle and calculated physiological cross sectional area (PCSA) for six strepsirrhines, six platyrrhines and seven catarrhines spanning nearly the entire primate body size range (from Galago to Gorilla). These variables were studied for each muscle and across muscles groups (flexors, extensors, and “others” – i.e., supinator, pronators, etc.) using RMA regression (alpha = 0.05). Total forearm (TFor) PCSA is tightly correlated with TFor MM across the whole sample and within each suborder and is slightly positively allometric across the whole sample and within strepsirrhines and catarrhines (but not platyrrhines). Similar correlations and allometry between MM and PCSA are found within the flexor and extensor compartments. However, FL is not highly correlated with total MM variables and instead correlates with locomotor patterns. Thus primate forearm muscles have relatively consistent (though slightly positively allometric) crossections, but vary according to FL, suggesting locomotor adaptations in stretch and flexibility, but not force production. Therefore the variation in the anatomy of the epicondyle likely relates to adaptations for mechanical advantage and not muscle force as has been previously hypothesized.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/259137
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