Through the examination of direct and indirect epigraphic sources, this article traces the history of the site of Ḥalzaw (Ḥlzwm), located in the wādī Lajiya, from its origins in the 7th century BC until its latest references in the 4th century AD. The textual corpus from Ḥalzaw is comprised of seven major inscriptions (four votive inscriptions and three fragmentary construction texts), plus twenty-five funerary objects. These epigraphs mention the name of the city (Ḥlzwm), its tribe (ḏ-Ḥlzwm), god (Bs2mm), and the main local clan (Bʿgm). Four new inscriptions dating from the late 1st century BC - 1st century AD are published in this study; two important inscriptions that were already known, such as CSAI II, 14=RES 4336, and UAM 327 are also re-examined here. Throughout its history, the control of Ḥalzaw was disputed between various regional powers and belonged to different realms (first Qatabān, and, from the end of the 1st century BC, Radmān). These historical events are reflected in the local inscriptions, which were first written in Qatabanic and afterwards in a mixture of Qatabanic and Sabaic elements. The study also shows that the same historical and linguistic dynamics observed in the sources from Ḥalzaw also occurred in wādī Markha as well as in the regions of Radmān and Ḥaṣī, namely in all the areas situated south and south-east of Qatabān, areas that were under the rule of this kingdom before they became independent.

The town of Halzaw (Hlzwm) between Qataban, Radman and Himyar. An essay on political, religious and linguistic history

PRIOLETTA, ALESSIA
2013

Abstract

Through the examination of direct and indirect epigraphic sources, this article traces the history of the site of Ḥalzaw (Ḥlzwm), located in the wādī Lajiya, from its origins in the 7th century BC until its latest references in the 4th century AD. The textual corpus from Ḥalzaw is comprised of seven major inscriptions (four votive inscriptions and three fragmentary construction texts), plus twenty-five funerary objects. These epigraphs mention the name of the city (Ḥlzwm), its tribe (ḏ-Ḥlzwm), god (Bs2mm), and the main local clan (Bʿgm). Four new inscriptions dating from the late 1st century BC - 1st century AD are published in this study; two important inscriptions that were already known, such as CSAI II, 14=RES 4336, and UAM 327 are also re-examined here. Throughout its history, the control of Ḥalzaw was disputed between various regional powers and belonged to different realms (first Qatabān, and, from the end of the 1st century BC, Radmān). These historical events are reflected in the local inscriptions, which were first written in Qatabanic and afterwards in a mixture of Qatabanic and Sabaic elements. The study also shows that the same historical and linguistic dynamics observed in the sources from Ḥalzaw also occurred in wādī Markha as well as in the regions of Radmān and Ḥaṣī, namely in all the areas situated south and south-east of Qatabān, areas that were under the rule of this kingdom before they became independent.
Prioletta, Alessia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/301650
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