In order to evaluate the effects of moderate alcohol intake on intermediate metabolites, five normal subjects and five euglycemic insulin-dependent diabetics (IDDM) were administered two different isocaloric diets; in one diet 35% of the caloric intake consisted of red wine. The insulin-dependent diabetics were connected to an artificial endocrine pancreas (AEP), and glucose levels were continuously monitored. Blood lactate, pyruvate, acetoacetate (AcAc), 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB), glycerol, free fatty acids (FFA), and alanine levels were measured over a 15-hour period from 9 AM to 12 PM. The results showed that alcohol intake did not significantly influence the glucose profiles in either group (111 +/- 4 mg/100 ml versus 110 +/- 4 mg/100 ml for IDDM; 72 +/- 2 mg/100 ml versus 82 +/- 3 mg/100 ml for controls, 15-hour mean +/- SEM), but in both groups it induced a marked increased in the levels of lactate (1.115 +/- 0.067 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.706 +/- 0.031 mM/liter without alcohol for IDDM; 0.847 +/- 0.052 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.666 +/- 0.035 mM/liter without alcohol for controls), in the lactate/pyruvate ratio (24.04 +/- 2.12 with alcohol versus 11.42 +/- 0.20 without alcohol for IDDM; 20.84 +/- 2.16 with alcohol versus 11.62 +/- 0.27 without alcohol for controls), in the levels of 3-OHB (0.081 +/- 0.007 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.046 +/- 0.003 mM/liter without alcohol for IDDM; 0.067 +/- 0.007 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.025 +/- 0.002 mM/liter without alcohol for controls) and in the 3-OHB/AcAc ratio (1.452 +/- 0.153 with alcohol versus 0.599 +/- 0.036 without alcohol for IDDM; 1.723 +/- 0.198 with alcohol versus 0.439 +/- 0.040 without alcohol for controls) because of a more reduced redox state. Alcohol intake during meals depressed alanine concentration, while glycerol levels showed a transient increase. Reduced blood FFA concentrations after alcohol intake were observed only in controls. This study demonstrates that moderate alcohol intake with meals also affects intermediate metabolites despite euglycemia. These effects were similar both in normal subjects and in IDDM, even if the harmful effects of alcohol may be enhanced by poor metabolic control in the latter.

Metabolic effects of moderate alcohol intake with meals in insulin-dependent diabetics controlled by artificial endocrine pancreas (AEP) and in normal subjects.

DEL PRATO, STEFANO;
1983

Abstract

In order to evaluate the effects of moderate alcohol intake on intermediate metabolites, five normal subjects and five euglycemic insulin-dependent diabetics (IDDM) were administered two different isocaloric diets; in one diet 35% of the caloric intake consisted of red wine. The insulin-dependent diabetics were connected to an artificial endocrine pancreas (AEP), and glucose levels were continuously monitored. Blood lactate, pyruvate, acetoacetate (AcAc), 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-OHB), glycerol, free fatty acids (FFA), and alanine levels were measured over a 15-hour period from 9 AM to 12 PM. The results showed that alcohol intake did not significantly influence the glucose profiles in either group (111 +/- 4 mg/100 ml versus 110 +/- 4 mg/100 ml for IDDM; 72 +/- 2 mg/100 ml versus 82 +/- 3 mg/100 ml for controls, 15-hour mean +/- SEM), but in both groups it induced a marked increased in the levels of lactate (1.115 +/- 0.067 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.706 +/- 0.031 mM/liter without alcohol for IDDM; 0.847 +/- 0.052 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.666 +/- 0.035 mM/liter without alcohol for controls), in the lactate/pyruvate ratio (24.04 +/- 2.12 with alcohol versus 11.42 +/- 0.20 without alcohol for IDDM; 20.84 +/- 2.16 with alcohol versus 11.62 +/- 0.27 without alcohol for controls), in the levels of 3-OHB (0.081 +/- 0.007 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.046 +/- 0.003 mM/liter without alcohol for IDDM; 0.067 +/- 0.007 mM/liter with alcohol versus 0.025 +/- 0.002 mM/liter without alcohol for controls) and in the 3-OHB/AcAc ratio (1.452 +/- 0.153 with alcohol versus 0.599 +/- 0.036 without alcohol for IDDM; 1.723 +/- 0.198 with alcohol versus 0.439 +/- 0.040 without alcohol for controls) because of a more reduced redox state. Alcohol intake during meals depressed alanine concentration, while glycerol levels showed a transient increase. Reduced blood FFA concentrations after alcohol intake were observed only in controls. This study demonstrates that moderate alcohol intake with meals also affects intermediate metabolites despite euglycemia. These effects were similar both in normal subjects and in IDDM, even if the harmful effects of alcohol may be enhanced by poor metabolic control in the latter.
Avogaro, A; Duner, E; Marescotti, C; Ferrara, D; DEL PRATO, Stefano; Nosadini, R; Tiengo, A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/3957
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