Bovine thyroid membranes possess both ADP ribosyltransferase and NAD glycohydrolase activities with the same Km values for NAD and the same pH optima. In intact membranes, the ADP ribosyltransferase is limited in its extent by the amount of available membrane acceptor which can be ADP-ribosylated; in membranes solubilized with lithium diiodosalicylate, an artificial acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester, can be substituted to eliminate this limitation. The product of the ADP ribosyltransferase is a mono-ADP-ribosylated acceptor whether the intact or solubilized membrane provides the enzyme activity and whether membrane or exogenous acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester, is utilized. The intact membranes and the solubilized preparation also have an enzyme activity which can release AMP from the mono-ADP-ribosylated acceptor whether formed by the action of the membrane ADP ribosyltransferase or the A promoter of cholera toxin. The NAD glycohydrolase activity appears to represent the half-reaction of the ADP ribosyltransferase, i.e. an activity measurable substituting water for a membrane acceptor or L-arginine methyl ester. Membranes from functional rat thyroid cells in culture, i.e. cells chronically stimulated by thyrotropin and unresponsive to further additions of thyrotropin, have low ADP-ribosylation but high NAD glycohydrolase activities. In contrast, membranes from nonfunctional rat thyroid cells, i.e. cells unresponsive to thyrotropin, have high ADP-ribosylation and low NAD glycohydrolase activities. NAD hydrolysis by the NAD glycohydrolase activity cannot account for the low ADP-ribosylation activity in membranes from the functioning cells, and its low level of ADP-ribosylation can be eliminated by solubilizing the membranes and substituting an artificial acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester. The ADP ribosyltransferase activity of rat thyroid cell membrane preparations can be enhanced by thyrotropin in a dose-dependent manner but not by insulin, glucagon, hydrocortisone, adrenocorticotropin, or its glycoprotein hormone analog, human chorionic gonadotropin. It is thus suggested (i) that, in analogy to cholera toxin, thyrotropin-stimulated ADP-ribosylation may be important in the regulation of the adenylate cyclase response and (ii) that the level of membrane acceptor available for ADP-ribosylation may relate both to a stable "'activated" state of the adenylate cyclase system in cells chronically stimulated with thyrotropin and/or to a desensitized state with regard to a failure of more thyrotropin to elicit additional functional responses.

Thyroid membrane ADP ribosyltransferase activity. Stimulation by thyrotropin and activity in functioning and nonfunctioning rat thyroid cells in culture.

VITTI, PAOLO;
1981

Abstract

Bovine thyroid membranes possess both ADP ribosyltransferase and NAD glycohydrolase activities with the same Km values for NAD and the same pH optima. In intact membranes, the ADP ribosyltransferase is limited in its extent by the amount of available membrane acceptor which can be ADP-ribosylated; in membranes solubilized with lithium diiodosalicylate, an artificial acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester, can be substituted to eliminate this limitation. The product of the ADP ribosyltransferase is a mono-ADP-ribosylated acceptor whether the intact or solubilized membrane provides the enzyme activity and whether membrane or exogenous acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester, is utilized. The intact membranes and the solubilized preparation also have an enzyme activity which can release AMP from the mono-ADP-ribosylated acceptor whether formed by the action of the membrane ADP ribosyltransferase or the A promoter of cholera toxin. The NAD glycohydrolase activity appears to represent the half-reaction of the ADP ribosyltransferase, i.e. an activity measurable substituting water for a membrane acceptor or L-arginine methyl ester. Membranes from functional rat thyroid cells in culture, i.e. cells chronically stimulated by thyrotropin and unresponsive to further additions of thyrotropin, have low ADP-ribosylation but high NAD glycohydrolase activities. In contrast, membranes from nonfunctional rat thyroid cells, i.e. cells unresponsive to thyrotropin, have high ADP-ribosylation and low NAD glycohydrolase activities. NAD hydrolysis by the NAD glycohydrolase activity cannot account for the low ADP-ribosylation activity in membranes from the functioning cells, and its low level of ADP-ribosylation can be eliminated by solubilizing the membranes and substituting an artificial acceptor, L-arginine methyl ester. The ADP ribosyltransferase activity of rat thyroid cell membrane preparations can be enhanced by thyrotropin in a dose-dependent manner but not by insulin, glucagon, hydrocortisone, adrenocorticotropin, or its glycoprotein hormone analog, human chorionic gonadotropin. It is thus suggested (i) that, in analogy to cholera toxin, thyrotropin-stimulated ADP-ribosylation may be important in the regulation of the adenylate cyclase response and (ii) that the level of membrane acceptor available for ADP-ribosylation may relate both to a stable "'activated" state of the adenylate cyclase system in cells chronically stimulated with thyrotropin and/or to a desensitized state with regard to a failure of more thyrotropin to elicit additional functional responses.
De Wolf, Mj; Vitti, Paolo; Ambesi Impiombato, Fs; Kohn, Ld
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/4081
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