The presence of thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAb) in patients with Graves' disease is well established. Considerable evidence has accumulated that these are antibodies to thyroid plasma membrane components related to the TSH receptor. The question of whether thyroid stimulation is mediated by a direct interaction with the TSH binding site is still debated. Recent data obtained by the use of monoclonal antibodies to the TSH receptor are consistent with the view that Graves' immunoglobulins comprise antibodies to at least two different components of the TSH receptor complex, one of which is more strictly related to the binding of TSH and the other to the transmission of the hormonal effect. The causative role of TSAb in the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease is widely recognized. The use of human specific stimulation assays has circumvented the objection of the relatively low frequency of LATS-positive patients. Individual variations in the thyroid response may account for the lack of correlation between levels of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins and most parameters of thyroid function. In this respect, the interference of non-stimulatory thyroid antibody and of other autoimmune mechanisms may be of importance. An important clinical implication of TSAb and TSH-binding inhibiting antibody determinations is their prognostic value in predicting the relapse of hyperthyroidism in treated patients. This clinical application has been so far limited by the technical difficulty of the assays. This emphasizes the need for a simple and reliable test, which can be used for routine measurements of TSAb.

[Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins. The related antigens]

MACCHIA, ENRICO;VITTI, PAOLO;MONZANI, FABIO;
1982

Abstract

The presence of thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSAb) in patients with Graves' disease is well established. Considerable evidence has accumulated that these are antibodies to thyroid plasma membrane components related to the TSH receptor. The question of whether thyroid stimulation is mediated by a direct interaction with the TSH binding site is still debated. Recent data obtained by the use of monoclonal antibodies to the TSH receptor are consistent with the view that Graves' immunoglobulins comprise antibodies to at least two different components of the TSH receptor complex, one of which is more strictly related to the binding of TSH and the other to the transmission of the hormonal effect. The causative role of TSAb in the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease is widely recognized. The use of human specific stimulation assays has circumvented the objection of the relatively low frequency of LATS-positive patients. Individual variations in the thyroid response may account for the lack of correlation between levels of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins and most parameters of thyroid function. In this respect, the interference of non-stimulatory thyroid antibody and of other autoimmune mechanisms may be of importance. An important clinical implication of TSAb and TSH-binding inhibiting antibody determinations is their prognostic value in predicting the relapse of hyperthyroidism in treated patients. This clinical application has been so far limited by the technical difficulty of the assays. This emphasizes the need for a simple and reliable test, which can be used for routine measurements of TSAb.
Pinchera, A; Fenzi, Gf; Macchia, Enrico; Vitti, Paolo; Monzani, Fabio; Kohn, Ld
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/4083
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact