TSH secretion, with particular regard to the nocturnal surge of the hormone, was evaluated in 15 women (age range, 35-66 yr; mean, 50 yr) with untreated major endogenous depression and 15 healthy women (age range, 32-67 yr; mean, 53 yr) using an ultrasensitive assay. Mean morning (0830 h) TSH values did not differ in the 2 groups (1.3 +/- 02 mU/L in depressives and 1.4 +/- 0.1 mU/L in controls), whereas mean nighttime (2400-0200 h) values were significantly reduced in depressives (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.3 mU/L; P less than 0.0005). At variance with the control group, morning and nighttime TSH values did not differ in the depressives. The nocturnal serum TSH surge was abolished in 14 of 15 depressed patients. The mean peak TSH value after TRH was slightly yet significantly lower in the depressives. Patients with subnormal (less than 0.4 mU/L) TSH values in the morning had a serum TSH increase after TRH less than 2 mU/L in 5 of 6 cases and a lack of the nocturnal TSH surge in 6 of 6. Among the 9 patients with normal TSH values in the morning, the nocturnal serum TSH surge was lost in 8 of 9, whereas the response to TRH was normal in all. The depressives, at variance with other reports, showed significantly lower values of total and free thyroid hormones. Mean serum sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and ferritin were also significantly reduced. In conclusion, major endogenous depression is associated with a major impairment of TSH secretion, which baseline TSH measurements in the morning and the evaluation of the TSH response to TRH may not reveal. In this regard, the loss of the nocturnal serum TSH rise would appear to be a more sensitive indicator of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis alterations in depressives than the TRH test, which is commonly used in the evaluation of these patients. The lack of the nocturnal TSH surge may be responsible for the reduced thyroid hormone secretion and supports the case for some degree of central hypothyroidism in endogenous depression.

Nocturnal serum thyrotropin (TSH) surge and the TSH response to TSH-releasing hormone: dissociated behavior in untreated depressives

DELL'OSSO, LILIANA;
1990

Abstract

TSH secretion, with particular regard to the nocturnal surge of the hormone, was evaluated in 15 women (age range, 35-66 yr; mean, 50 yr) with untreated major endogenous depression and 15 healthy women (age range, 32-67 yr; mean, 53 yr) using an ultrasensitive assay. Mean morning (0830 h) TSH values did not differ in the 2 groups (1.3 +/- 02 mU/L in depressives and 1.4 +/- 0.1 mU/L in controls), whereas mean nighttime (2400-0200 h) values were significantly reduced in depressives (1.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.3 mU/L; P less than 0.0005). At variance with the control group, morning and nighttime TSH values did not differ in the depressives. The nocturnal serum TSH surge was abolished in 14 of 15 depressed patients. The mean peak TSH value after TRH was slightly yet significantly lower in the depressives. Patients with subnormal (less than 0.4 mU/L) TSH values in the morning had a serum TSH increase after TRH less than 2 mU/L in 5 of 6 cases and a lack of the nocturnal TSH surge in 6 of 6. Among the 9 patients with normal TSH values in the morning, the nocturnal serum TSH surge was lost in 8 of 9, whereas the response to TRH was normal in all. The depressives, at variance with other reports, showed significantly lower values of total and free thyroid hormones. Mean serum sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and ferritin were also significantly reduced. In conclusion, major endogenous depression is associated with a major impairment of TSH secretion, which baseline TSH measurements in the morning and the evaluation of the TSH response to TRH may not reveal. In this regard, the loss of the nocturnal serum TSH rise would appear to be a more sensitive indicator of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis alterations in depressives than the TRH test, which is commonly used in the evaluation of these patients. The lack of the nocturnal TSH surge may be responsible for the reduced thyroid hormone secretion and supports the case for some degree of central hypothyroidism in endogenous depression.
Bartalena, L; Placidi, Gf; Martino, E; Falcone, M; Pellegrini, L; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Pacchiarotti, A; Pinchera, A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/8197
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