The World Health Organization identifies among the top ten causes of death, illness and disability for adult women on male aggression driving, while other international bodies regularly draw attention to this issue. So far little has been done by binding, until the approval of the Convention in Istanbul in 2011 (ratified in Italy in 2012, with the Law 119/2013). In particular the welfare systems do not implement measures and strategies where this priority receives integrated responses both social and health care. Furthermore, the complex nature of the problem and the extension in quantitative terms the phenomenon involves the difficulty of developing predictive tools that help to combat this problem by acting proactively.It is argued here that only by focusing on gendercategory analysis and its possible declinations explanatory you can respond effectively.In Italy the experience of the Centersanti-violence to more than twenty-five years since their establishment shows that much has been achieved, albeit with continuing territorial differences, in terms of system, confirming the view that a more holistic view of the problem could lead more extensively preventive practices and increased predictive sensibilities in an attempt to deal with the problem. In addition to antiviolence Centers have been set up at the emergency departments Rose codes, sign of a more mature awareness that land consequences of violence not recognized from the earliest rumblings in the relationship with the partners are a major social cost, with short and long term health consequences.It is well known that failure prevention will exponentially increase the risk of developing many diseases that plague these women throughout their lives, often with cumulative effects.In our article we will make a comparative evaluation of both the Antiviolence Centers that Pink codes into tworegions: Sardinia and Tuscany, in order to highlight the different professional styles in risk assessment and in taking charge of women victims of violence, with particular attention to the tools available to the social and health professions. The aim is to highlight theresults of a more effectively achieved, which results in personal empowerment and social costs, when violence is addressed by the assumption of an alliance betweenknowledge feeding in structuring a network job.We would here highlight the disparity of forces in the field, and then of relations between social actors, since at the heart of the problem is the violence emerged, i.e. the body of a woman, to give succor and answers necessarily immediate, while conversely the chances to resolve or address it must always be built, conceived, negotiated, assessed, but mostly fished out from oblivion and the collective removal. Knowing that to resolve this problem we need a interpretative and operational discontinuity with respect to this departure and asymmetry than the symbolic violence is embedded in the system (Galtung, 1990; Bourdieu, 1998; Farmer, 2003), we would here highlight unresolved social policies node, one linkedto a "risk assessment" in order to implement effective measures against not only repressive but also preventive.It would thus contribute to building an alternative vision to the thought and the dominant practice in social policies,characterized by a sectoral approach that relies on the inevitable emergence to solve. Undoubtedly, this practice is a first response, emergency and reparative type, but it is difficult to give a method, while looming risk burn out of social workers who work there. Therefore only by integrating health and social care and forms of prevention and empowerment will tackle more effectively the phenomenon.

Failure to prevent violence against women: the social costs and consequences on women's health

Biancheri, Rita
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2016

Abstract

The World Health Organization identifies among the top ten causes of death, illness and disability for adult women on male aggression driving, while other international bodies regularly draw attention to this issue. So far little has been done by binding, until the approval of the Convention in Istanbul in 2011 (ratified in Italy in 2012, with the Law 119/2013). In particular the welfare systems do not implement measures and strategies where this priority receives integrated responses both social and health care. Furthermore, the complex nature of the problem and the extension in quantitative terms the phenomenon involves the difficulty of developing predictive tools that help to combat this problem by acting proactively.It is argued here that only by focusing on gendercategory analysis and its possible declinations explanatory you can respond effectively.In Italy the experience of the Centersanti-violence to more than twenty-five years since their establishment shows that much has been achieved, albeit with continuing territorial differences, in terms of system, confirming the view that a more holistic view of the problem could lead more extensively preventive practices and increased predictive sensibilities in an attempt to deal with the problem. In addition to antiviolence Centers have been set up at the emergency departments Rose codes, sign of a more mature awareness that land consequences of violence not recognized from the earliest rumblings in the relationship with the partners are a major social cost, with short and long term health consequences.It is well known that failure prevention will exponentially increase the risk of developing many diseases that plague these women throughout their lives, often with cumulative effects.In our article we will make a comparative evaluation of both the Antiviolence Centers that Pink codes into tworegions: Sardinia and Tuscany, in order to highlight the different professional styles in risk assessment and in taking charge of women victims of violence, with particular attention to the tools available to the social and health professions. The aim is to highlight theresults of a more effectively achieved, which results in personal empowerment and social costs, when violence is addressed by the assumption of an alliance betweenknowledge feeding in structuring a network job.We would here highlight the disparity of forces in the field, and then of relations between social actors, since at the heart of the problem is the violence emerged, i.e. the body of a woman, to give succor and answers necessarily immediate, while conversely the chances to resolve or address it must always be built, conceived, negotiated, assessed, but mostly fished out from oblivion and the collective removal. Knowing that to resolve this problem we need a interpretative and operational discontinuity with respect to this departure and asymmetry than the symbolic violence is embedded in the system (Galtung, 1990; Bourdieu, 1998; Farmer, 2003), we would here highlight unresolved social policies node, one linkedto a "risk assessment" in order to implement effective measures against not only repressive but also preventive.It would thus contribute to building an alternative vision to the thought and the dominant practice in social policies,characterized by a sectoral approach that relies on the inevitable emergence to solve. Undoubtedly, this practice is a first response, emergency and reparative type, but it is difficult to give a method, while looming risk burn out of social workers who work there. Therefore only by integrating health and social care and forms of prevention and empowerment will tackle more effectively the phenomenon.
Biancheri, Rita; Piga, Maria Lucia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11568/866876
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