Introduction In the last decade, the comprehension of affective temperaments has helped us to outline the boundaries of mood disorders, and to expand our knowledge of nosographic areas other than those of affectivity, even if affectivity is closely related to them. In the field of substance use disorders, the temperamental profile of heroin addicts and alcoholics has been discussed elsewhere, but no comparison has yet been made between these two patient populations. Such a comparison would help to shed light on the pathogenetic mechanisms that link temperament with substance abuse. Methods 63 Heroin Use Disorder (HUD) and 94 Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) patients were compared with 130 healthy controls, with the aim of outlining affective temperament quantity and typology according to the formulation of Akiskal and Mallya. Results Cyclothymic temperamental quantity differentiated - both at the univariate and multivariate levels - between patients who had various different types of Substance Use Disorder, largely irrespective of the principal substance of abuse (heroin or alcohol); irritable temperament quantity differentiated HUD patients from AUD patients. Hyperthymic temperament typology seemed to be more frequent in healthy controls at both univariate and multivariate levels. Limitation Cross-sectional study. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that cyclothymic temperament quantity could best correspond to the temperamental profile of Substance Use Disorder patients independently of principal substance of abuse (alcohol or heroin), and that irritable temperament quantity may differentiate HUD from AUD patients. Hyperthymic temperament typology seemed to be highly protective for HUD and, though a bit less, for AUD patients, and was a typical feature of healthy controls.

Opposed effects of hyperthymic and cyclothymic temperament in substance use disorder (heroin- or alcohol-dependent patients)

Rovai, Luca;Maremmani, Angelo G. I.;Bacciardi, Silvia;Gazzarrini, Denise;Pallucchini, Alessandro;Spera, Vincenza;Perugi, Giulio;Maremmani, Icro
2017-01-01

Abstract

Introduction In the last decade, the comprehension of affective temperaments has helped us to outline the boundaries of mood disorders, and to expand our knowledge of nosographic areas other than those of affectivity, even if affectivity is closely related to them. In the field of substance use disorders, the temperamental profile of heroin addicts and alcoholics has been discussed elsewhere, but no comparison has yet been made between these two patient populations. Such a comparison would help to shed light on the pathogenetic mechanisms that link temperament with substance abuse. Methods 63 Heroin Use Disorder (HUD) and 94 Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) patients were compared with 130 healthy controls, with the aim of outlining affective temperament quantity and typology according to the formulation of Akiskal and Mallya. Results Cyclothymic temperamental quantity differentiated - both at the univariate and multivariate levels - between patients who had various different types of Substance Use Disorder, largely irrespective of the principal substance of abuse (heroin or alcohol); irritable temperament quantity differentiated HUD patients from AUD patients. Hyperthymic temperament typology seemed to be more frequent in healthy controls at both univariate and multivariate levels. Limitation Cross-sectional study. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that cyclothymic temperament quantity could best correspond to the temperamental profile of Substance Use Disorder patients independently of principal substance of abuse (alcohol or heroin), and that irritable temperament quantity may differentiate HUD from AUD patients. Hyperthymic temperament typology seemed to be highly protective for HUD and, though a bit less, for AUD patients, and was a typical feature of healthy controls.
2017
Rovai, Luca; Maremmani, Angelo G. I.; Bacciardi, Silvia; Gazzarrini, Denise; Pallucchini, Alessandro; Spera, Vincenza; Perugi, Giulio; Maremmani, Icro...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11568/908559
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